Posts tagged Columbus Chinese
Unique Vegetables in Chinese Food: Bamboo Shoots
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China is a large continent which in turn brings a lot of different food varieties. One vegetable that is seen in a lot of different Chinese cuisines in Bamboo shoots. What are they you ask?

As the name implies, bamboo shoots are the edible shoots of the bamboo plant, which is native to Asia. They are cut from the plant once they appear above the ground to preserve their tenderness and because if they are left to grow exposed, they will turn a green color. 

Fresh bamboo shoots are available at Asian or Chinese markets, or you can find canned bamboo shoots at most local grocery stores. Fresh shoots need to be boiled until tender, then husked and cut into pieces. Canned bamboo shoots only need to be heated since they are pre-cooked.

You may have eaten bamboo shoots at a Chinese restaurant as they are often part of a stir-fry. You can try them at home in almost any stir-fry dish, including stir-fry beef with bamboo shoots and stir-fry mushrooms and bamboo shoots.

Next time you order your favorite dish from Windchimes thing…does this have Bamboo shoots in it?

 
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Celebrating Our Customers
Google Business  Image from one of our customers

Google Business Image from one of our customers

Windchimes has been so lucky to have such great customers through out the years. We are so happy that you enjoy our food and keep coming back for more!

We love to hear from you whether its through liking our Facebook posts or using our hashtag #WindchimesChinese food on any social media to connect all of us together.

One place that we’ve been seeing a lot of love is on Google Business. We get so many great reviews from you on our food and even get some great pictures too! We would love to celebrate how much you love us and will even feature your images on Facebook, Instagram, and Google Business. We love to see you get creative!

We love you and would love to show our appreciation! So, next time you’re in snap a picture and tag us #WindchimesChinese and find us on all the different types of social media!

 
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Happy Lunar New Year: The Celebration Begins
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Just because the new year has begun doesn't mean you're allowed to rest.

While most countries that observe Lunar New Year offer three to seven days of public holidays, celebrations don't end until the 15th day of the first lunar month, also known as the Lantern Festival. (Lunar New Year in 2019 lasts from February 5 to February 19.)

There is a list of superstitious dos and don'ts for the new year but the rule of thumb is to say a lot of "kung hei fat choy"or "gong xi fa cai," and avoid saying things that may sound like a less auspicious word.

During the festival, people will travel around to visit relatives, who will prepare snacks and fill up candy boxes for the visits -- except for the third day of the month.

It's believed that arguments are more likely to happen on that day -- February 9, this year -- called chi kou (or "red mouth"). Hence, most people will engage in other activities like visiting a temple. In Hong Kong, a major spring festival horse racing event takes place every year on the third day.

During the 15 days, married couples have to give out red packets filled with money to children (and unmarried adults) to wish them luck.

The seventh day is renri, or the people's birthday (February 11). when the Chinese mother goddess Nuwa is said to have created mankind.

The highlight comes on the last day, during the Lantern Festival (February 19).

Being the only day when young girls in ancient Chinese society could go out to admire lanterns and meet boys, it's also been dubbed Chinese Valentine's Day.

Nowadays, cities around the world still put on massive lantern displays and fairs on the 15th day of the festival.

Some create more sparks than others. Like Nuanquan, a small Chinese town that puts on a spectacular "firework" show by throwing molten metal against a cold stone city wall.

Kung hei fat choy!

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The Tien Tisn Pepper
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One thing Chinese food has is great flavor! From sweet to savory it showcases how pleasurable eating can be.

One main element they use in dishes are peppers. They can range from a slight heat to making your mouth feel on fire. A common pepper used a lot in dishes is the Tien Tsin Pepper. You may know Tien Tsin peppers by another, more descriptive name – Chinese red peppers. These are the surprisingly hot, dried chilies that you sometimes find in you Kung Pao chicken or one of many other Szechuan or Hunan dishes. They’re popular to use as a flavoring spice that are removed prior to serving (unless you order your meal extra hot).

Can you eat the Tien Tsin Pepper? Think of it as a small cayenne peppers with extra pop and you’ll be on the right path for both looks and tastes. Tien Tsin chilies are branch-like thin, one to two inches in length. They age from green to a vibrant red, at which time they are picked and dried for their typical usage

The Tien Tsin pepper’s slimness is very reminiscent of cayenne, and it has a neutral, almost musty, flavor behind the heat similar to cayenne too. This is not a complex chili in terms of flavor; the heat is the star here. And that certainly colors how it is used in the kitchen.

All in all it’s a great element to any Chinese dish and makes each bite DELICIOUS!

Tien Tisn Pepper in Kung Pao Trio (look for the pepper flakes in the dish!)

Tien Tisn Pepper in Kung Pao Trio (look for the pepper flakes in the dish!)

Monthly Horozope: September
 
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The Month of the Metal Rooster of the Chinese calendar starts on September 10th, 2018 and ends on October 8th, 2018. On September 9th, the new moon announces the passage in the Chinese calendar from the Metal Monkey Month to the Month of the Metal Rooster of the Year of the Earth Dog 2018.

The return of the summer vacation is more often synonymous with excitement at the prospect of developing future vacation plans rather than the excitement of meeting one's office colleagues. It is important to always be conscientious during the 2018 Month of the Rooster, avoid making abrupt decisions and pay attention to words that may offend the sentience of loved ones. The dictates of accuracy and the requirement of perfection can compromise an ever-fragile harmony.

According to the monthly Chinese horoscope of September 2018, the Rooster reminds everyone of their sense of responsibility, commitment and the importance of striving towards an irreproachable organization of their business. Similarly, the Rooster (of the month) placed under the astrological sign of the Dog (of the year) has the potential to transform the beginning of autumn 2018 into moments of joy and sharing.

ENERGIES OF THE METAL ROOSTER MONTH 2018 FOR THE 12 SIGNS OF THE CHINESE CALENDAR

According to the Chinese horoscope, the excess of an element is always synonymous with a simultaneous deficiency. As of September 10, 2018, the Metal element is up sharply in the Chinese calendar. The Wood and Water elements undergo an important decrease in their respective levels: Wood and Water are periodically deficient in the energetic chart of the 5 elements of Chinese cosmology and Feng Shui.

A Month of the Rooster during a Year of the Dog is sprinkled with moments of stress and paranoia that can occur without warning in a professional context. Excess in Metal can cause big stock market fluctuations and an increase in financial risk-taking. At the same time, the decrease in Wood and Water during the Chinese month of the Rooster benefits business activity, which translates into a significant increase in productivity. However, it should be remembered that in the event of ethical misconduct during a Dog-controlled year, appetite for gain can quickly become an indigestible poison.

On the social level, excess in Metal can lead to a tendency to idealize luxury, opulence and temporal power. Similarly, if a lack of Wood can lead to feelings of guilt or a depressive crisis in the event of unresolved litigation, the lack of Water can cause anxiety or even panic in the face of events that rather deserve to be analyzed coldly.

Honey in China's Culture
 
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In the spirit of International Honey Day this Saturday I wanted to talk about the history of honey and how it plays into Chinese culture.

Talking about bees and honey in history must always include Ancient Egypt and Ancient China. But starting from the very beginning of times, we must say that bees are actually one of the oldest forms of animal life, since Neolithic Age, preceding humans on Earth by 10 to 20 million years. When they appeared, humans did whatever the other animals were doing at the time, meaning, stole the bees’ honey to feed themselves. Homo Sapiens and honey were together since the Stone Age.

As the centuries went on honey was considered an important medicinal remedy as shown in their writings dating from about 2000 BC. As with India, honey also occupied an important place in Chinese culture, another great eastern civilization. Honey is mentioned in the Shi Jing, or Classic of Poetry, an important book of Chinese theology written in the 6th century BCE. According to Ancient Chinese medicine, honey is a major component to earth, one of the five basic elements, and acts on the stomach and spleen meridians of the human body.


According to Chinese medicine, honey has a balanced character (neither Yin nor Yang) and acts according to the principles of the Earth element, entering the lung, spleen and large intestine channels. (as mentioned by earlier writings). During the Xin Dynasty, around 220BC, a book of Chinese medicine says: “Those who often take honey can keep fit, honey can cure indigestion, it can be used in medicaments to bind other ingredients together.”

 
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Need your Honey fix today? Try out our Honey Glazed Shrimp. Doctors orders!

Killer Condiments: Spicy Mustard
 
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In honor of National Mustard Day on August 4th, I thought we should talk about and celebrate one of the popular condiments that is used in most Chinese restaurants: Spicy Mustard.

This popular condiment is typically served with appetizers like egg rolls or wonton strips and can bring a flare of flavor by adding some heat. This is done by mixing dry mustard powder with water, creating a chemical reaction that makes the sharp, hot taste. How does this all work. Here's the science to break it down.

Mustard seeds come from the mustard plant, a member of the cabbage family. They contain two sulphur compounds, myrosin, and sinigrin, as well as an enzyme, myrosinase. When the seeds are broken and water is added, the enzyme breaks down the sulphur compounds. The result is the sharp tasting oil that gives mustard its pungency and helps explain why the name mustard comes from the Latin words mustum (must) and ardens (burning).
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Want to try and make it yourself? Here's a simple recipe to spice up any of your dishes at home!

My First Chinese Restaurant Experience
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I remember my first Chinese Restaurant experience fondly. There was something special about it that has left an impression on me and my memory. When I think about it I've been to so many different restaurants in my 32 years of life and most of them I don't remember but New Peking Chinese Restaurant will always have a special place in my heart. 

Honestly, I don't really know if this was the first time I had actually had Chinese food or not but this place I remember going to as a family. We would go with my mom ,sister, Grandpa and Japanese Grandma to this spot off of North Dixie in a semi tiny strip mall (where all the good food is in the midwest). I just remember it having a big red door that transported you into a different world of smells and visual memories. We would always go on a Wednesday when my dad would be out golfing with his friends and we got to treat ourselves to some dinner out. I remember the menu having so much food that ranged not only from Chinese food but also Korean. This was the first time I had ever seen Bipmpop and it was impressive! 

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Since I was a pretty picker eater those days so I was scared of half of the menu because I didn't know what to expect. I had always liked chicken and thought that you couldn't really go wrong with something that could be both sweet and sour and ordered that dish in hopes that it would be ok. And boy was it! The taste was so new and interesting and left my taste buds confused and excited made me really interested in the wold of Chinese food and what it all had to offer. In a way I couldn't believe that there was this food out there and so many varieties of it. Even though New Peking is no longer around I will always remember that red door and how it opened my taste buds to new experiences and every time I taste sweet and sour chicken I think not only of that but also the wonderful times I had there with family and how Chinese food can bring people together.

What's the Difference?: Szechuan vs Hunan Chicken
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Chinese cuisine is very important in their culture. It not only showcases the flavors of China but also the different regions that they originated from. Two particular styles of cooking that sometimes get confused with one another is Szechuan and Hunan. They seem similar but they have particular differences that you might not pick up on right away.

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Here's the breakdown:

Szechuan cuisin (sometimes also known as Sichuan) is a style of Chinese cooking originating in the Sichuan Province of southwestern China. This region is famous for their pungently, spicey flavors. There is usually a generous amounts of garlic and chili peppers in this dish along with citrus like spices that could produce a "tingly-numbing" senations in the mouth. This dish also pairs well with peanuts, sesame paste and ginger that can give it a more dynamic taste. Szechuan's flavor is known more for it's sweet and spicey taste rather it being just hot.

Hunan cuisin (also known as Xiang) originated in the Xiang River region and the Western Hunan Province. This style also has a "hot tongue numbing" seasoning known as 'mala'. It, too, has a lot of garlic and chili pepper with the addition of shallots. Though, it may seem like it is similar to Szechuan, Hunan is more for dry and purely hot with an oiler taste. Even though it's a more plain flavor there still is a range of fresh ingredients used that changes seasonally to combate with the weather around the region.

Who knew that cooking could be so regional!?! Come back and learn more as we unpack the Windchimes menu and find out more history where these food favorites comes from. 

Do you have a favorite? Did you even know the difference between the two? Come into WIndchimes today and try both out and see which one you like better!

Daily Horoscope: April 11, 2018
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Chinese calendar:
Day of the Water Rooster
Month of the Wood Rabbit
Year of the Earth Dog 2018

Polarity of the Day: Yin
Polarity of the Month: Yin
Polarity of the Year: Yang
Lucky directions: West
Lucky colors: Red, pink

THE WATER ROOSTER IS THE MOST OPEN-MINDED OF ALL ROOSTERS, EVEN IF HIS PERSONALITY RETAINS A STRONG DOSE OF CONSERVATISM COATED WITH A FORMAL PLUMAGE, WITHOUT WHICH HE WOULD NOT REALLY LIVE UP TO HIS ZODIACAL SIGN.

A Water Rooster is a calm person who are meticulously responsible, alert, and neat. They are devoted and proud people but don't get too egotistical!

A Water Rooster is a calm person who are meticulously responsible, alert, and neat. They are devoted and proud people but don't get too egotistical!

 

The Water Rooster is a pragmatic being, gifted for everything he undertakes, although he can sometimes be handicapped by his immoderate taste for the superfluous. His excessive ambition and his interest in very diverse subjects tend to make him lose time in his projects. However, his charm and ability to attract faithful and devoted friends around him allow him to compensate for his shortcomings and weaknesses, which are still quite rare.

Today, the energies of the Chinese zodiac sign of the Water Rooster favor artistic crafts. If you are married, enjoy a quiet evening at home. If you are single and you have a romantic appointment, don’t get impressed by your partner's fiery declarations during your date, even though it’s always nice to receive such nicely turned compliments.

Daily Energetic chart: Weak in Fire element
Birth's character and destiny (BaGua): Grace