Posts tagged Columbus Ohio
Monthly Horoscope: June Metal Horse
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A horse month is often conducive to identifying key opportunities and tools that are essential for personal and professional growth.

Here’s more of a breakdown for all signs:

Rat Horoscope:

Monthly rating - 4/10 - Rat, you have litigation or debate that needs your attention if you do not want the situation to deteriorate to your disadvantage. Be vigilant and keep your valuables safe. If you are going through an episode of anxiety, get help before the situation seems out of control. Nevertheless, the Metal feeds and protects the Rat. This is good news, since it allows you to be stronger to face the annoyances of the month of the Horse. Take advantage of this time to meet friends you have not seen for a long time. Their advice can be very useful to you soon. You will be granted projection provided you do not isolate yourself.

Ox Horoscope:

Monthly rating - 4/10 - Ox, a remodeling of your emotional life can surprise you in the short term. This will be partly due to a situation you do not control. Whatever happens, do not make things harder than they are. Stay true to your principles. On the other hand, stubbornness and grudge can cause some regrettable financial losses. Preserve your serenity of mind by indulging in relaxing activities and laughing as much as possible. This is not the time to sink into depression because, as you feel deep inside, all this is fleeting.

Tiger Horoscope:

Monthly rating - 8/10 - Good luck, opportunity, action and fusional love are the ingredients of the energy mix that awaits the Tiger for this month of the Horse. This is an excellent time, during which each investment has the potential to be successful. Reunion with friends can restore strong links. Everything is fine. Be careful all the same to any possible excess of zeal. Always keep a minimum of control on your desires of the moment so as not to compromise a lunar month which is initially very beneficial to you.

Rabbit Horoscope:

Monthly rating - 7/10 -Rabbit, this is a particularly beneficial month financially and professionally. Successful business trips are possible, where interesting meetings can generate profitable future collaborations. A person or institution could finally honor or repay a debt to you. You are on a good dynamic, Continue to preserve on the projects that you lead at this moment. Beautiful prospects are waiting for you if you keep you pace. This is not the time to change your lifestyle.

Dragon Horoscope:

Monthly rating - 5/10 - Dragon, do not compromise what you have built hard because of systematic and counterproductive opposition. As a first step, prepare for a change that is difficult to accept in your social circle. Do not take out your pies right now, it may not be your turn to scroll. Assume your statements and affirmations of the past to keep a clear conscience. The balance is maintained on the financial level but freedom and comfort have their price to pay. Be reasonable.

Snake Horoscope:

Monthly rating - 5/10 - Snake, rely on your sense of strategy to get appreciated differently, because your charms do not always operate in the same way depending on the time or place. In love, secrets and enigmas are hard to bear for pretenders who want to approach you. Take time to rest when you feel that your strength is decreasing. Expand your listening skills. you may hear some very useful info for your near future.

Horse Horoscope:

Monthly rating - 7/10 - Horse, on a sentimental level it may be finally time to stop running behind people who do not give you the importance you serve. This is a good thing because you have a good chance of making the most of the time gained by new, much more interesting meetings. However, be sure of your actions, not to be forced to go back. If you do the housework, fo ti well. Otherwise, on a professional level, you can expect a much better dynamic than the previous month. Finally, your usefulness and effectiveness are recognized within the team. If you are self-emplyed, competitors may be tempted to imitate you, but fortunately without much success. You calm the jealousies for a moment. Recognition and promotion give you hope for the future.

Goat Horoscope:

Monthly ratings - 8/10 - Goat, the pace is similar to the previous month, except that solutions finally come to you. Know how to seize them. Avoid the mistake of bad organization to put the odds on your side. Family reunions and important friendships are to be expected, but remember not to express yourself more than reason. Let others assume the consequences of their remarks because on your side, you have other projects to manage. You will sooner or later end up reap the fruits of your previous meetings and your professional investment. Know how to share your leisure time and that of your work equitably. This is where your main difficulty lies in 2019. This will not happen on your own with out a sustained effort on your past. Preserve and build relentlessly, especially as you are a month the favored of this period of the Chinese calendar.

Monkey Horoscope:

Monthly rating - 7/10 - Monkey, it is a month favorable to potential financial transactions, embellished with some tripes which will have the particularly of combining work and leisure. In addition, an unexpected change in the organization of your work may finally give you the opportunity to fully express some of your qualities still unknown to your professional partners In this case you have the opportunity to express your innovative ideas to attentive minds, presupposed to collaborate with you. At home, conflicts arising from difference of opinion on domestic issues gradually fade away. It is a period of compromise, but also alliance with your relatives.

Rooster Horoscope:

Monthly rating - 5/10 - Rooster, faced with a desire for sudden more pronounced than accustomed, you should keep under control your desires to go elsewhere. This is not an ideal time to make long term decisions. The month is hectic emotionally. Give more importance to domestic events that may seem trivial. At work, the result may not be up to your expectations. It is better to capitalize on time and perseverance to achieve your goals. Know how to listen to the advice of the wiser, it might be very useful these days.

Dog Horoscope:

Monthly rating - 7/10 - Dog, do not be unduly irritated by the superficial behavior that you observe, because to alarm you at the slightest annoyance exhausts you more than anything else. It’s a good month for financial matters, but avoid making any major transactions without the supervision of a competent knowledgeable and trusted person. Force yourself to look at the events positively. The few trips made during the month are enriching on a human level. Emotional stability possible you control any jealous feeling.

Pig Horoscope:

Monthly rating - 6/10 - Pig, if you are in a period of flutter at the professional level, do not panic, with a little motivation you should have some interesting career opportunties, just as your perseverance will eventually pay off. On an emotional level, you learn how to get rid of your complexes one by one and even to transform them into strength. you are finally ready for a new beginning, on many aspects of your life. If material satisfaction is in sight, it remains best postpone major investments to a later date.

Want to know more? Check it out here!

What is Sesame?
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Sesame is a common ingredient in Chinese food but where does it come from?

Sesame  is a flowering plant in the genus Sesamum, also called benne. Numerous wild relatives occur in Africa and a smaller number in India. It is widely naturalized in tropical regions around the world and is cultivated for its edible seeds, which grow in pods or "buns". World production in 2016 was 6.1 million tonnes, with Tanzania, Myanmar, India, and Sudan as the largest producers.

Sesame seed is one of the oldest oilseed crops known, domesticated well over 3000 years ago. Sesamum has many other species, most being wild and native to sub-Saharan Africa. Sesamum indicum, the cultivated type, originated in India and is tolerant to drought-like conditions, growing where other crops fail.

Sesame has one of the highest oil contents of any seed. With a rich, nutty flavor, it is a common ingredient in cuisines across the world. Like other nuts and foods, it can trigger allergic reactions in some people.

Sesame seeds are sometimes sold with the seed coat removed (decorticated); this variety is often present on top of baked goods in many countries.

Sesame seed is a common ingredient in various cuisines. It is used whole in cooking for its rich, nutty flavour. Sesame seeds are sometimes added to breads, including bagels and the tops of hamburger buns. Sesame seeds may be baked into crackers, often in the form of sticks. In Sicily and France, the seeds are eaten on bread (ficelle sésame, sesame thread). In Greece, the seeds are also used in cakes.

History of Food: Lychee Fruit
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Since Lychee is this years lucky fruit I thought we should learn a little more about this history behind it!

Lychee: The lychee is also a spiky red fruit, a bit bigger than a cherry, with a pit surrounded by an inedible peel and somewhat translucent milky flesh. It is very high in Vitamin C and is juicy and sweet with a pleasing hint of tartness. It’s mostly eaten fresh but can also be canned. It can be found in many frozen yogurt places in the U.S. as a popular topping. It is also a popular flavor for many Asian drinks, snacks, and dessert products.

It is a tropical tree native to the Guangdong and Fujian provinces of China, where cultivation is documented from 1059 AD. China is the main producer of lychees, followed by India, other countries in Southeast Asia, the Indian Subcontinent and South Africa. A tall evergreen tree, the lychee bears small fleshy fruits. The outside of the fruit is pink-red, roughly textured and inedible, covering sweet flesh eaten in many different dessert dishes.

What are some of your favorite Lychee treats?


China Summer Fun
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Summer is just around the corner and if you need some places to think about visiting think about China. This huge continent has so much to offer during the summer months.

Check out some of the reasons and things to do here:

The Weather

From mid-May through mid-July, the rainy season kicks in across southern and eastern China. The rains are nicknamed the plum rains (梅雨 meiyu, or “may yoo” in Mandarin) for the season when the fruit ripens. Frankly, during those weeks, it feels as if nothing can grow but mold. But don’t be downtrodden; bring rain gear and you’ll be fine. Northern China doesn’t have the same precipitation pattern so make your itinerary include Beijing and Xi’an if you’re worried about getting too wet. After the rains end, you’re likely to seek shade from the scorching sun and blue skies that govern the later part of the summer.

There’s a lot to do in the summer months and some great festivals to try to catch as well. The summer months are the perfect time to tour Tibet as the weather is the mildest and most of the festivals take place in July and August. Visit beach cities like Qingdao and Xiamen to catch some rays, or head all the way down to Hainan to really cook on the white sand beaches of the island. If you’re hanging out in any of the big cities, Beijing, Chengdu, and Shanghai all have great outdoor venues and you’ll find many places to sit in the shade and drink tea - or something stronger - and relax.

 

Summer Activities

Beach: If it’s beach-time you’re after, try one of these destinations for sand and sun:

  • Xiamen, formerly known as Amoy, is a relaxing smallish city directly across from Taiwan that has great beaches, long stretches of the promenade, nice seafood restaurants, and a laid-back atmosphere.

  • Qingdao, most famous for its beer, is another smaller Chinese city with famous beaches and plenty of places to soak up the sun.

  • Sanya, a city on Hainan Island in the South China Sea, is the mecca for serious beach-seekers. Full of top international five-star beach resorts, you can take your pick and have a classy beach holiday. (Be sure not to miss the matching his & her Hawaiian outfits available in all the hotel shops...)

Nature: If you’re looking to see some nature and mountain landscapes then these are perfect choices:

  • Tibet enjoys its best weather in summer months and there's not a better time to go in order to catch great festivals.

  • Jiuzhaigou is a famous national park and reserve in Sichuan Province. Many ethnic Tibetans live there so it's culturally interesting but the reason to go is the scenery. Full of pristine forests and clear lakes, if you're coming from a big city you'll be relieved to see that there is some amazing nature left in China.

  • Mount Song & Shaolin Temple is a great destination if you want to combine a little history and religion with your nature walk.

  • Four Buddhist Holy Mountains draw thousands of tourists and climbers every summer. If you're really ambitious, perhaps you could make it to all four?

  • The Great Wall just has no match in China. No, it's not off the beaten path. Yes, you'll probably be there with hundreds of other tourists. But it's famous for a reason. Don't miss it if you're near Beijing.

Green: If you don't have time to head too far out, some Chinese cities have plenty of green, many have gardens which are famous:

  • Visit any Chinese park

  • Suzhou's famous gardens

  • Hangzhou and the West Lake or Moganshan.

  • The Giant Panda Breeding Base in Chengdu offers lots of green bamboo and giant cuddly animals.

Shanghai: In Shanghai, these are great summer activities:

Beijing: And in Beijing, any of these activities are great for summertime.

Summer Festivals

Summer Holidays

Qi Xi, Night of Sevens (Chinese Valentine’s Day) is not an official holiday, but a traditional celebration usually falling in August.

Chinese kids are off from school between early July and the end of August.

Fruit in Chinese Food
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As I slowly eat my way through the Windchimes Menu I realized that there were a lot of dishes that included an ingredient that typically isn’t part of a main dish: Fruit. I was curious why this was such a staple in Chinese food ranging from Orange, Mango, to even Pineapple. I dug around to see why this was an important ingredient to some of my favorite dishes and here’s what I found:

One way chefs create new dishes is to make use of fruits in season. Doing so produces dishes with new color, texture, and flavor. When fruits are not in season they need not despair, but use them dehydrated. They can and do use fruits such as raisons, dried apricots, sugared preserved fruits such as jams, and even canned and frozen fruits.

In southern cooking, such as that around Guangzhou, chefs make use of local fresh fruits frequently using peaches, lychees and longans. Perhaps because of influences from neighboring south sea islands, they also find and use pineapples, bananas, coconuts, and rambutans. In the mid-Yangtze valley in and around Shanghai, Hwaiyang and Yangzhou, chefs use fresh apples, dates, and pears and their preserved relatives. In the north, around Beijing and Shandung, apples, apricots, pears, persimmons, and dates are popular fresh and dried. And in the west, chefs from the Hunan and Sichuan provinces add fruits to their spicy dishes including oranges, longans, and lychees to satisfy their yen for sweet in their dishes. Occasionally sweet dishes without spiciness are even used departing from the routine flavorings in this region.

Since Chinese do not make clear demarcations between medicinal herbs and fruits or vegetables, in their cooking they also use herbs such as dried san tza which are crab apples or go ji better known as Lyceum Chinese. Both of these herb-fruits have a slight sweet and an acidic taste; people like them because they are good for you and highly nutritious.

So, next time you are in check out some of the dishes that include fruit and think about how great it is to be able to have this dish all year round!

Recipes to Try at Home: Cantonese Noodles
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Have you ever wanted to venture outside the typical meal? Do you want to impress someone with a new dish or just want to try to make one of your favorite dishes at home? Well, you’re in luck! Today I’m posting how to make one of our favorite dishes Cantonese Noodles!

The recipe comes from The Little Spice Jar website. Check it out below:

INGREDIENTS:

  • 12 ounces Hong Kong style egg noodles

  • 8 scallions

  • 2 teaspoons oyster sauce

  • ¼ cup low sodium soy sauce

  • 2 teaspoons sugar

  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic

  • ¼ – ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes

  • ½ teaspoon salt

  • 2 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil

  • 2 tablespoons high heat oil (such as canola, vegetable)

  • 1 ½ cups mixed veggies (such as coleslaw style cabbage, shredded carrots, and bean sprouts)

DIRECTIONS:

  1.  Bring a large stockpot of water to boil. While the water is boiling, separate the greens from the whites of the scallion. Cut into one-inch pieces then quarter the 1-inch piece vertically so you end up with thinly julienned scallions, set aside. In a bowl, combine the oyster sauce, soy sauce, sugar, minced garlic, red pepper flakes, salt, and 1 teaspoon of sesame oil, stir to combine, set aside.

  2. When the water comes to a boil, add the noodles and allow them to boil for 2-4 minutes (according to package directions). Drain and rinse under cold running water.

  3. Heat a large wok or a 16-18 inch skillet over high heat. Let the skillet heat for several minutes until it becomes SCREAMING HOT. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon of sesame oil and 1 tablespoon of canola oil. When the pan becomes very hot and the oil starts to shimmer, add the noodles in a thin even layer. Grab the handle and carefully swirl the pan so the oil evenly coats all the noodles. Allow the noodles to cook for 4-6 minute or until they become crispy.

  4. Flip the noodles over using a large spatula. Do this carefully, don’t worry if you cannot get all of them to turn at once. Do it in portions if necessary. Drizzle the remaining 1 tablespoon of sesame oil and 1 tablespoon of canola oil around the perimeters of the pan and again, lift the skillet with handle and swirl the pan to allow the oil to distribute. Let the noodles fry for an additional 3-5 minutes. Remove the noodles to a plate.

  5. Heat the remaining 1 teaspoon of sesame oil, along with the white part of the scallion and let sizzle for just 10 seconds. Add the shredded carrots if using, and let cook for an additional 10 seconds. Add the noodles back into the skillet and toss. Separate the noodles so there aren’t any large clumps. Toss in the shredded cabbage mix, if using and drizzle with the soy sauce mixture and toss continuously for 1-2 minutes or until the sauce distributes evenly over the noodles.

  6. Add the bean sprouts if using and the greens of scallions. Toss to combine and serve immediately.

NOTES:

  1. For vegetarians, you can swap the oyster sauce for dark soy sauce or an oyster flavored sauce (see ingredients some of them actually don’t contain oyster extract at all!)

  2. If you do not have a skillet/wok large enough to fit all the noodles, you can do this in 2 batches (use a ½ tablespoon of sesame oil and ½ tablespoon of canola oil per batch/per side.)

The prep and cook time all take about 15 mins totaling in half an hour. Now if that doesn’t sound easy and . like a complete meal I don’t know what does!

Try it out today and post your images to show how you did!

Unique Vegetables in Chinese Food: Bamboo Shoots
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China is a large continent which in turn brings a lot of different food varieties. One vegetable that is seen in a lot of different Chinese cuisines in Bamboo shoots. What are they you ask?

As the name implies, bamboo shoots are the edible shoots of the bamboo plant, which is native to Asia. They are cut from the plant once they appear above the ground to preserve their tenderness and because if they are left to grow exposed, they will turn a green color. 

Fresh bamboo shoots are available at Asian or Chinese markets, or you can find canned bamboo shoots at most local grocery stores. Fresh shoots need to be boiled until tender, then husked and cut into pieces. Canned bamboo shoots only need to be heated since they are pre-cooked.

You may have eaten bamboo shoots at a Chinese restaurant as they are often part of a stir-fry. You can try them at home in almost any stir-fry dish, including stir-fry beef with bamboo shoots and stir-fry mushrooms and bamboo shoots.

Next time you order your favorite dish from Windchimes thing…does this have Bamboo shoots in it?

 
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Recipes to Try at Home: Spring Rolls
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SPRING ROLLS

  • Yield: 24 spring rolls

  • Prep Time: 10 minutes

  • Cook Time: 30 minutes

  • Total Time: 40 minutes

  • Course: Appetizer, dim sum

Spring Rolls are the vegetarian super light, crispy and tender vegetarian appetizer cousin of the traditional egg roll.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1/4 cup canola oil divided

  • 8 cups napa cabbage sliced thinly

  • 2 cloves garlic minced

  • 2 carrots sliced thinly

  • 8 ounces bamboo shoots sliced thinly

  • 2 tablespoons mirin

  • 1/4 cup low sodium soy sauce

  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil

  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch

  • 24 8" square spring roll wrappers

  • canola oil for frying

INSTRUCTIONS

Note: click on times in the instructions to start a kitchen timer while cooking.

  1. Add half the canola oil to a large heavy skillet on medium high heat and add in the napa cabbage cooking 8-10 minutes while stirring until almost all the liquid it releases has cooked off.

  2. Add in the garlic, carrots and bamboo shoots and cook for 1 minute while stirring before adding in the mirin, soy sauce and sesame oil and stirring again then let filling cool completely.

  3. Mix cornstarch with two tablespoons of water.

  4. Lay out the spring roll wrapper, brush cornstarch slurry around the edges to moisten and add about 2 tablespoons of filling in a long rectangle shape, folding in from the sides and rolling the wrappers closed tightly.

  5. Heat 3 inches of oil in a dutch oven to 325 degrees and fry the spring rolls until golden brown (about 2-3 minutes).

2019: Year of the Pig
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A New Year means a new Animal in the Chinese Culture. The Pig is the twelfth in the 12-year cycle of Chinese zodiac sign. The Years of the Pig include 1923, 1935, 1947, 1959, 1971, 1983, 1995, 2007, 2019, 2031, 2043...

Earthly Branch of Birth Year: Hai
Wu Xing (The Five Elements): Shui (Water)
Yin Yang: Yin

People with Chinese zodiac Pig sign are considerate, responsible, independent and optimistic. They always show generousness and mercy to endure other people's mistakes, which help them gain harmonious interpersonal relationships. However, sometimes they will behave lazy and lack actions. In addition, pure hearts would let them be cheated easily in daily life.

  • Strengths
    Warm-hearted, good-tempered, loyal, honest, gentle

  • Weaknesses
    Naive, gullible, sluggish, short-tempered

    As the Zodiac Year of Birth (Ben Ming Nian) for people of Pig sign, 2019 could be a year full of ups and downs in all respects for them. They could receive support and help from their colleagues and leaders, but might feel stressful under too many regulations. The fortune in wealth is fair. Although they can expect a salary increase and also gain more income from financial products, there could be a lot of unexpected expenditure offsetting the favorable money increase. As for love relationship, single females of Chinese zodiac Pig may have a fairly good fortune and could start a sweet relationship in 2019.

Pad Thai: Food History
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What is Pad Thai?

Pad thai is made with soaked dried rice noodles, which are stir-fried with eggs and chopped firm tofu, and is flavored with tamarind pulp, fish sauce, dried shrimp, garlic or shallots, red chili pepper and palm sugar and served with lime wedges and often chopped roasted peanuts. It may contain other vegetables like bean sprouts, garlic chives, pickled radishes or turnips, and raw banana flowers. It may also contain fresh shrimp, crab, squid, chicken or other animal products. Many of the ingredients are provided on the side as condiments such as the red chili pepper, lime wedges, roasted peanuts, bean sprouts and other miscellaneous fresh vegetables. Vegetarian versions may substitute soy sauce for the fish sauce and omit the shrimp.


Where did it come from?

A dish of stir-fried rice noodles is thought by some to have been introduced to Ayutthaya during the time of the Ayutthaya Kingdom by Chinese traders and subsequently altered to reflect Thai flavor profiles.

During World War II, Thailand suffered a rice shortage due to the war and floods. To reduce domestic rice consumption, the Thai government under Prime Minister Plaek Phibunsongkhram promoted eating noodles instead. His government promoted rice noodles and helped to establish the identity of Thailand. As a result, a new noodle called sen chan (named after Chanthaburi Province) was created. Pad thai has since become one of Thailand's national dishes. Today, some food vendors add pork or chicken (although the original recipe did not contain pork because of the government's perception that pork was a Chinese meat). Some food vendors still use the original recipe.

Come in to Windchimes today to try our version! You wont’ be disappointed!