Posts tagged Cooking Styles
Recipes to Try at Home: Chicken Lettuce Wraps

Ingredients

  • 4 cups water

  • 2 cups uncooked white rice

  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil

  • 1 pound ground pork

  • 1 bunch green onions, thinly sliced

  • 1/2 teaspoon minced garlic

  • 1 (14 ounce) package firm tofu, drained and cubed

  • 2 carrots, shredded

  • 3 tablespoons hoisin sauce

  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce

  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil

  • 1/4 teaspoon hot chile paste

  • 1 head iceberg lettuce leaves, separated

  • Add all ingredients to list

Directions

  • Prep - 15 m

  • Cook - 32 m

  • Ready In - 47 m

  1. In a saucepan combine the water and rice. Bring to a boil, cover, and reduce heat to a simmer. Simmer for 20 minutes, until water is absorbed. Set aside and keep warm.

  2. Heat oil in a wok over medium-high heat. Cook the pork, green onions, and garlic for 5 to 7 minutes, or until lightly brown. Add the tofu, carrot, Hoisin, and soy sauce, stirring frequently until heated through. Remove from heat, and stir in the sesame oil and chile paste.

  3. To serve: spoon a small amount of rice into each lettuce leaf, top with the stir-fry mixture, and drizzle with additional soy sauce or hoisin, if desired. Wrap the lettuce leaf to enclose the filling.

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Quick Asian Lettuce Wraps

Fresh, wholesome & tasty Asian wraps!

Footnotes

  • Optional additional stir fry ingredients

  • These may be used in place of or in addition to the tofu: chopped peanuts, peppers, shrimp, rice noodles, diced chicken, scrambled egg or bean sprouts.

How to Make Fried Rice
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So, we at Windchimes know you can’t ALWAYS get our delicious food and we are ok with that. But what happens if you get a craving for one of our dishes and it’s late at night of your out of town!? What do you do?

Well, worry no longer because we can tell you how to make some of our dishes to ease that hunger!

We will start off simple. How to make fried rice. This one is quick and can be done when you barely have anything in the fridge.

Ingredients:

  • about 2 tablespoons butter

  • 3 eggs

  • 2 medium carrots, diced

  • 1 small onion, diced

  • 3 cloves of garlic, minced (for kick)

  • 1 cup frozen peas, thawed

  • 4 cups cooked rice (Windchimes leftover rice is PERFECT for this)

  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce

Instructions:

  • Heat 1 tablespoon of butter into a large skillet

  • Add the eggs and scramble until fully cooked. Remove them from the pan and set aside

  • Add the remaining tablespoon of butter into the pan

  • Add carrots and onion to the pan and cook until tender, 3-4 minutes

  • Stir in garlic and cook for an additional minute

  • Add in the cold rice and peas and saute for 3-4 minutes. The rice should brown up a bit.

  • Add the eggs back to the pan and stir in soy sauce. Cook for 1-2 minutes to heat through

  • Serve and enjoy immediately!!!

It might not taste EXACTLY like Windchimes fried rice bu HEY! we can’t tell you all the secrets or you won’t be back!

Try it out and let us know how it went for you! We would love to see and hear about your cooking experience!

Fried Rice: Why It's So Good?!
 
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What makes fried rice so good? I was floored the other day when I finally tried Windchimes' fried rice. It had a flavor that I had never tasted before and couldn't stop eating it. I couldn't stop thinking about it and had to go back to get it again. It was almost too good for words! Though, it got me thinking what exactly was fried rice and what is the history behind it.

The basics is fried rice is typically pre cooked rice that has been stir-fried in a wok or frying pan and is usually mixed with other ingredients such as eggs, vegetables, seafood, or meat. Most of the time it's made from left overs from other dishes and can be eaten on it's own or as a pair to another fish. 

While the exact origins of fried rice are lost to history, it’s believed that it was invented sometime during the Sui dynasty (A.D. 589–618), in the city of Yangzhou in eastern Jiangsu province. Yangchow (Yangzhou) fried rice is still the standard by which all other Chinese fried rice dishes are judged: morsels of fluffy rice tossed with roast pork, prawns, scallions, and peas. In American-Chinese restaurants, you’ll sometimes find it called "special fried rice." Today, fried rice dishes are found throughout China, particularly in the south, where rice is the staple grain.

But why is it so good? I think one factor that comes from it being so good is the nostalgic aspect of it.  For me fried rice was an easy dish I could make easily enough for myself when I first lived on my own. Something so easy as taking leftover Chinese food and throwing it into a pan and adding an egg to it (for protein!) and some veggies to make it a balanced meal. It was quick and good. I still think of those simpler times and every time I have fried rice I'm taken back to that place.

 
Cuban Fried Rice

Cuban Fried Rice

 

Fried rice has also spread to other countries putting their own spin on the popular dish. From Thailand to Cuba and Portugal to Japan. All these places have their own versions that have some basis of the original dish but making it their own and I can't wait to try them all!

Inspiring Foods: Mongolia & Indonesia
 
Kids in Mongolia 

Kids in Mongolia 

Women in Indonesia

Women in Indonesia

 

China is a large continent which boarders and in close proximity to other countries. Just as we’ve learned from previous blog posts there are different cooking styles/flavors from other regions of China. This also spreads over to the different influences that China has picked up on countries that are close by such as Mongolia and Indonesia.

Let's start with Mongolia. This country is sandwiched between China and Russia, both very large and in charge countries with their own complicated history to Mongolia but this didn't mean they wouldn't be influential. Since this is a landlocked country on a rocky, mountainous terrain they are not able to produce a lot of vegetables or spices limiting them to a meat and dairy based diet. A lot of the Mongolian people raise their own animals and have created several dishes such as mutton and even have their own version of a dumpling called Buuz. Even though Mongolian cuisine primarily consists of meat it is still influential showcasing how even when you are limited you can still make amazing food

Buuz - is a like a dumpling.

Buuz - is a like a dumpling.

Now on to Indonesia. The flavors in this country, since way more south of Mongolia and China, create a whole different palette. Their food consist of a lot of flavor and spices that really give your food a kick and a more complex flavor. Bali curry typically consist of meat that is cooked in a curry paste that is combined of several different spices to give it a unique flavor. This then is boiled in coconut milk and a variety of vegetables can be added such as potatoes, green beans, and carrots. As you can tell these dishes are both different but similar stemming from the concept of using what is around them where they live.

 
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Even though these two countries are very far apart they still have a common thread of food. Sure, their flavors may be drastically different but there is a reason why Windchimes has both on their menu. These two countries are important cultural influences to China whether you realize it or not. We live in an age where these different flavors be carried out in all parts of the world. With the ever expanding food scene we are able to give people not only a taste of China but other places like Mongolia and Indonesia.  There are so many cultural influences on food and that’s what makes it so magical. We are able to bring so much of ourselves and interests into it and share it with the people who are curious to try it. So, why not be that person and come in and try our Mongolian Style cooking and Bali Curry. I know you won’t be disappointed!