Posts tagged Windchimes Chinese
Recipes to Try at Home: Fried Tofu
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This is a new dish that I didn’t know I needed in my life: Japanese Style Fried Tofu or otherwise known as Agedashi Tofu.

Windchimes Chinese has a version of this that only made me crave this style of tofu more so I found a recipe to try out!

AGEDASHI TOFU (DEEP-FRIED TOFU IN TSUYU BROTH)

Make this traditional Japanese tofu dish at home in just 25 minutes!

  • Author: Caroline Phelps

  • Prep Time: 15 minutes

  • Cook Time: 10 minutes

  • Total Time: 25 minutes

  • Yield: 4 people 1x

  • Category: Side

  • Method: Deep fryig

  • Cuisine: Japanese

SCALE 1X2X3X

INGREDIENTS

  • Two 12-ounce box silken tofu (drained)

  • potato starch or cornstarch (for dusting)

  • oil (for frying)

  • 1 cup dashi stock

  • 2 tablespoons mirin

  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce

  • 1/2 teaspoon granulated sugar

  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

TOPPINGS:

  • ginger (peeled and grated)

  • green onion or chives (finely chopped)

  • shiso leaves (chopped) optional

  • myoga (chopped) optional

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Drain the tofu and then wrap it in paper towels and place in a strainer for 30 minutes to remove excess moisture. Cut the tofu into four pieces, dry again with paper towels, then coat with the potato starch.

  2. Heat the oil to a suitable temperature for deep-frying (around 340 degrees). Carefully put the tofu pieces in to fry and when they turn golden, remove and drain on paper towels to remove excess oil.

  3. In a small pan heat up the dashi stock, mirin, soy sauce, sugar and salt. Bring to the boil, ensuring that the sugar has dissolved.

  4. Divide the tofu among four bowls. Pour a little of the hot broth into each bowl and garnish with the grated daikon, a dab of grated ginger, shiso, myoga, and green onion to taste.

NOTES

This Agedashi Tofu recipe is meant to be enjoyed immediately. The broth can be saved for later, but once the tofu is fried it will not keep in the fridge.

Also if you are more a visual learner here’s a video breaking down how to make this delicious dish too!

If you are like me you get overwhelmed quickly by the cooking process and end up just ordering the dish from Windchimes!

Monthly Horoscope: April Earth Dragon
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The Month of the Earth Dragon of the Chinese calendar starts on April 6th, 2019 and ends on May 4th, 2019. On May 5th, the new moon announces the passage in the Chinese calendar from the Fire Rabbit Month to the Month of the Earth Dragon of the Year of the Earth Pig, third month of the Chinese Year.

It is a period favorable to material and social transitions, marked by realism, lucidity but also by creative ideas. Good fortune in games and lottery is also favorable, because in this Dragon Month during the Year of the Pig 2019, all hopes are allowed. It is a prosperous month in terms of organization, during which community service is encouraged and progresses at a brisk pace.

This is the perfect time to set the stage for optimizing the future profitability of projects in the making. It is finally time to embark on an entrepreneurial activity that combines leisure, creativity and profits. During this period of the Year of the Pig under the zodiac sign of the Dragon, many may be tempted to reveal projects long kept secret. For some, it will be the process of enrolling in a sports or theater club, for others start a home-made jams business or even start writing the first chapter of a novel.

In summary, during the Dragon Month during the Year of the Pig 2019, know how to share your joys, your desires as well as your fears. And in this context, the Month of the Dragon makes it possible to realize how much friendship is a precious wealth to preserve and maintain.

Here are the horoscopes for the rest of the signs:

Rat Horoscope from April 6th to May 4th, 2019
Monthly Rat Rating: 6 / 10

Rat, you decompress from the accumulated stress of the previous months. You are resuming your strength. This is a key period to reorganize your future. If you are considering a change of work or home, start looking now for your situation to stabilize after the summer break. Finances are stabilizing. Watch out for the words that hurt. Be indulgent.

Ox Horoscope from April 6th to May 4th, 2019
Monthly Ox Rating: 5 / 10

Ox (Buffalo), you have to accept some changes that you did not want to see happen. An extra effort is required at work. You will be rewarded with your organizational know-how. Delicate period with regard to affective relationships. Do not stay in your corner waiting for it to pass.

Tiger Horoscope from April 6th to May 4th, 2019
Monthly Tiger Rating: 6 / 10

Tiger, you feel a small drop in shape compared to last month. Be careful what you say or what you rest on. Do not always trust luck. Watch your wallet. In case of emotional breakdown do not let things last and try an immediate reconciliation.

Rabbit Horoscope from April 6th to May 4th, 2019
Monthly Rabbit Rating: 7 / 10

Rabbit (Cat), your projects evolve positively over time and you have something to celebrate. Some new activities may take longer than expected. Make your sense of strategy work. New associations or friendly links can strengthen your social position. On the financial level, buy useful. When it comes to love, it's your self-confidence that is your main charm. Imminent return to the big leagues.

Dragon Horoscope from April 6th to May 4th, 2019
Monthly Dragon Rating: 7 / 10

Dragon, beautiful monthly prospects are available to you in many areas. You will finally win your case on topics that are important to you. Finally you are being listened to you and appreciated for your merits. The joy and the will you are showing make you much more attractive. Above all, avoid having negative people around you. You do not need that, you already had your share last year.

Snake Horoscope from April 6th to May 4th, 2019
Monthly Snake Rating: 4 / 10

Snake, this is a difficult month financially, organizationally and in terms of relationships. You may not be able to pay your debts if you make a bad decision. Be precise and transparent in your actions. Do not try to put yourself in a mold at all costs. Do not do anything to encourage bad people or feed jealousies. It is time to get out of sight in order to keep your strength and preserve your achievements.

Horse Horoscope from April 6th to May 4th, 2019
Monthly Horse Rating: 5 / 10

Horse, some important questions that have not yet been resolved could fuel an underlying anxiety. Pressure on the professional level. Pay attention to the quality of your oral expression. Even if you could find yourself in difficult situations, you will still find the strength and support to resist valiantly. For this do not turn your back on people who want you good. Watch your health.

Goat Horoscope from April 6th to May 4th, 2019
Monthly Goat Rating: 6 / 10

Goat (Sheep), nothing obliges you to see people who give you a semblance of love and are devoid of respect for you. It is high time to move on. During this lunar month, take time for your side activities and creative work, because the Dragon has good reasons to make you a pleasant surprise. Organize yourself and stick to your agenda. Stop futile expenses that meet no other need than to satisfy the moment.

Monkey Horoscope from April 6th to May 4th, 2019
Monthly Monkey Rating: 6 / 10

Monkey, your morale is going up little by little. The situation continues to stabilize. Take care of the people who support you. Do not put too much distance with your allies and know how to hear good advice. Be determined but do not force things. Do not leave room for individualism. Period favorable to investments. You progress.

Rooster Horoscope from April 6th to May 4th, 2019
Monthly Rooster Rating: 7 / 10

Rooster, you did well to rest and avoid stress. With the arrival of the month of Dragon some good news can cheer you up. Make yourself forgiven if you have recently offended some people. Newcomers to your social circle appreciate you for your analytical sense. Realize your creative ideas. Good monthly period for love too. On the way to new adventures.

Dog Horoscope from April 6th to May 4th, 2019
Monthly Dog Rating: 4 / 10

Dog, this is not the time to spoil beautiful things with arguments over futile topics. Do not expose your weak points to everyone. Avoid acting under the domination of feelings. Your problems shall eventually fade over time. Be patient. Avoid aggressiveness because you might regret it later. If you feel abandoned, develop other areas of interest with new people. Courage. Stay alert.

Pig Horoscope from April 6th to May 4th, 2019
Monthly Pig Rating: 8 / 10

Pig (Boar), a joyful reunion helps you you recharge your energy. You will be supported in your future projects but for now it is more of a gestation period until a full liberation in the coming months. Some favorable solutions to recent problems will eventually make you smile again. You finally turn the page. Emotions as well as finances are stabilized. Harmony found. Luck is on your side.

Find out more here!

Recipes to Try at Home: Cantonese Noodles
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Have you ever wanted to venture outside the typical meal? Do you want to impress someone with a new dish or just want to try to make one of your favorite dishes at home? Well, you’re in luck! Today I’m posting how to make one of our favorite dishes Cantonese Noodles!

The recipe comes from The Little Spice Jar website. Check it out below:

INGREDIENTS:

  • 12 ounces Hong Kong style egg noodles

  • 8 scallions

  • 2 teaspoons oyster sauce

  • ¼ cup low sodium soy sauce

  • 2 teaspoons sugar

  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic

  • ¼ – ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes

  • ½ teaspoon salt

  • 2 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil

  • 2 tablespoons high heat oil (such as canola, vegetable)

  • 1 ½ cups mixed veggies (such as coleslaw style cabbage, shredded carrots, and bean sprouts)

DIRECTIONS:

  1.  Bring a large stockpot of water to boil. While the water is boiling, separate the greens from the whites of the scallion. Cut into one-inch pieces then quarter the 1-inch piece vertically so you end up with thinly julienned scallions, set aside. In a bowl, combine the oyster sauce, soy sauce, sugar, minced garlic, red pepper flakes, salt, and 1 teaspoon of sesame oil, stir to combine, set aside.

  2. When the water comes to a boil, add the noodles and allow them to boil for 2-4 minutes (according to package directions). Drain and rinse under cold running water.

  3. Heat a large wok or a 16-18 inch skillet over high heat. Let the skillet heat for several minutes until it becomes SCREAMING HOT. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon of sesame oil and 1 tablespoon of canola oil. When the pan becomes very hot and the oil starts to shimmer, add the noodles in a thin even layer. Grab the handle and carefully swirl the pan so the oil evenly coats all the noodles. Allow the noodles to cook for 4-6 minute or until they become crispy.

  4. Flip the noodles over using a large spatula. Do this carefully, don’t worry if you cannot get all of them to turn at once. Do it in portions if necessary. Drizzle the remaining 1 tablespoon of sesame oil and 1 tablespoon of canola oil around the perimeters of the pan and again, lift the skillet with handle and swirl the pan to allow the oil to distribute. Let the noodles fry for an additional 3-5 minutes. Remove the noodles to a plate.

  5. Heat the remaining 1 teaspoon of sesame oil, along with the white part of the scallion and let sizzle for just 10 seconds. Add the shredded carrots if using, and let cook for an additional 10 seconds. Add the noodles back into the skillet and toss. Separate the noodles so there aren’t any large clumps. Toss in the shredded cabbage mix, if using and drizzle with the soy sauce mixture and toss continuously for 1-2 minutes or until the sauce distributes evenly over the noodles.

  6. Add the bean sprouts if using and the greens of scallions. Toss to combine and serve immediately.

NOTES:

  1. For vegetarians, you can swap the oyster sauce for dark soy sauce or an oyster flavored sauce (see ingredients some of them actually don’t contain oyster extract at all!)

  2. If you do not have a skillet/wok large enough to fit all the noodles, you can do this in 2 batches (use a ½ tablespoon of sesame oil and ½ tablespoon of canola oil per batch/per side.)

The prep and cook time all take about 15 mins totaling in half an hour. Now if that doesn’t sound easy and . like a complete meal I don’t know what does!

Try it out today and post your images to show how you did!

Unique Vegetables in Chinese Food: Bamboo Shoots
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China is a large continent which in turn brings a lot of different food varieties. One vegetable that is seen in a lot of different Chinese cuisines in Bamboo shoots. What are they you ask?

As the name implies, bamboo shoots are the edible shoots of the bamboo plant, which is native to Asia. They are cut from the plant once they appear above the ground to preserve their tenderness and because if they are left to grow exposed, they will turn a green color. 

Fresh bamboo shoots are available at Asian or Chinese markets, or you can find canned bamboo shoots at most local grocery stores. Fresh shoots need to be boiled until tender, then husked and cut into pieces. Canned bamboo shoots only need to be heated since they are pre-cooked.

You may have eaten bamboo shoots at a Chinese restaurant as they are often part of a stir-fry. You can try them at home in almost any stir-fry dish, including stir-fry beef with bamboo shoots and stir-fry mushrooms and bamboo shoots.

Next time you order your favorite dish from Windchimes thing…does this have Bamboo shoots in it?

 
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Recipes to Try at Home: Spring Rolls
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SPRING ROLLS

  • Yield: 24 spring rolls

  • Prep Time: 10 minutes

  • Cook Time: 30 minutes

  • Total Time: 40 minutes

  • Course: Appetizer, dim sum

Spring Rolls are the vegetarian super light, crispy and tender vegetarian appetizer cousin of the traditional egg roll.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1/4 cup canola oil divided

  • 8 cups napa cabbage sliced thinly

  • 2 cloves garlic minced

  • 2 carrots sliced thinly

  • 8 ounces bamboo shoots sliced thinly

  • 2 tablespoons mirin

  • 1/4 cup low sodium soy sauce

  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil

  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch

  • 24 8" square spring roll wrappers

  • canola oil for frying

INSTRUCTIONS

Note: click on times in the instructions to start a kitchen timer while cooking.

  1. Add half the canola oil to a large heavy skillet on medium high heat and add in the napa cabbage cooking 8-10 minutes while stirring until almost all the liquid it releases has cooked off.

  2. Add in the garlic, carrots and bamboo shoots and cook for 1 minute while stirring before adding in the mirin, soy sauce and sesame oil and stirring again then let filling cool completely.

  3. Mix cornstarch with two tablespoons of water.

  4. Lay out the spring roll wrapper, brush cornstarch slurry around the edges to moisten and add about 2 tablespoons of filling in a long rectangle shape, folding in from the sides and rolling the wrappers closed tightly.

  5. Heat 3 inches of oil in a dutch oven to 325 degrees and fry the spring rolls until golden brown (about 2-3 minutes).

Celebrating Our Customers
Google Business  Image from one of our customers

Google Business Image from one of our customers

Windchimes has been so lucky to have such great customers through out the years. We are so happy that you enjoy our food and keep coming back for more!

We love to hear from you whether its through liking our Facebook posts or using our hashtag #WindchimesChinese food on any social media to connect all of us together.

One place that we’ve been seeing a lot of love is on Google Business. We get so many great reviews from you on our food and even get some great pictures too! We would love to celebrate how much you love us and will even feature your images on Facebook, Instagram, and Google Business. We love to see you get creative!

We love you and would love to show our appreciation! So, next time you’re in snap a picture and tag us #WindchimesChinese and find us on all the different types of social media!

 
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Year of the Earth Pig: Lucky Foods to Eat
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Theres’s several ways to preserve your luck during this new year! One way is to eat lucky foods.

This years lucky food is Lychee!

During this year of the Earth Pig the two elements that allow the 12 signs of the Chinese calendar to maintain positive harmony through out 2019 are Fire and Metal. These signs are than associated with different features like Fire being associated with red color and Metal with white and grey. Applied to food and Chinese medicine, any food, fruit or vegetable with red and white as dominate colors has the energies (or movements as Chinese elements are called) to Fire and Metal.

Through out the year we want to create a balance or harmony with Fire and Earth in our own signs. Below are foods that will help your specific signs.

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Lucky starters 2019: cabbage salad, mozzarella and tomato salad, white radish salad

Lucky main dishes 2019: Bolognese spaghetti, Neapolitan pizza, seasons pizza, stuffed eggplant, Thai red curry

Lucky desserts 2019: Lychee fruit salad, cherry clafoutis, strawberry tart, raspberry charlotte, yogurt, floating island

Why the Chicken Became Orange
 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orange_chicken

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orange_chicken

 

The variety of orange chicken most commonly found at North American Chinese restaurants consists of chopped, battered and fried chicken pieces coated in a sweet orange-flavored chili sauce, which thickens or caramelizes to a glaze. While the dish is very popular in the United States, it is most often found as a variation of General Tso's chicken in North America rather than the dish found in mainland China. Chef Andy Kao claims to have developed the original Chinese-American orange chicken recipe at a Panda Express in Hawaii in 1987. It’s become popular enough that other Chinese restaurants have created their own versions.

In Chinese, this dish is known as "橙花雞", literally "(Fresh) Orange peel chicken". The dish also has a variation known as "陳皮雞", literally "Dried Citrus peel chicken", referring to dried orange or tangerine peel, which is used in traditional Chinese medicine as well as cooking.

For restaurants outside of Asia, fresh orange peel is often used instead, or even no peel at all.

Come and and taste our Orange Chicken and see what you think!

What is Egg Foo Yung?
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Egg foo young is an omelette dish found in Chinese, Indonesian, British, and Chinese American cuisine.

Literally meaning "Hibiscus egg", this dish is prepared with beaten eggs and most often minced ham. It may be made with various vegetables such as bean sprouts, bamboo shoots, sliced cabbage, spring onions, mushrooms, and water chestnuts. When meat is used as an ingredient, a choice of roast pork, shrimp, chicken, beef, or lobster may be offered.

In Chinese Indonesian cuisine, it is known as fu yung hai, sometimes spelled as pu yung hai. The omelette is usually made from the mixture of vegetables such as carrots, bean sprouts, and cabbages, mixed with meats such as crab meat, shrimp, or minced chicken. The dish is served in sweet and sour sauce with peas.

In Western countries, the dish usually appears as a well-folded omelette with the non-egg ingredients embedded in the egg mixture, covered in or served with sauce or gravy. Chinese chefs in the United States, at least as early as the 1930s, created a pancake filled with eggs, vegetables, and meat or seafood. In a U.S. regional variation, many American-Chinese restaurants in St. Louis, Missouri, serve what is called a St. Paul sandwich, which is an egg foo young patty served with mayonnaise, dill pickle, and sometimes lettuce and tomato between two slices of white bread.

In the Netherlands, which has a local variation on the Chinese Indonesian cuisine, it is known as Foe yong hai, and is usually served with a sweet tomato sauce. Strictly, according to hai in the name, it should contain crab, but it is often served without this ingredient.

There are several other variations in different countries of this dish but all have the simple start of an omelette. You should come in and try ours and see what you think!

History of Sweet & Sour Cuisine
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Sweet and sour is a very popular Chinese dish and one of my favorite but how did it become so popular? Is it really something that’s traditional in China or was it adapted to American’s tastes?

Chinese cuisine uses a variety of ingredients and cooking methods that are very different from other cultures. Their own food and recipes vary according to the different Chinese regions, but generally speaking their basic diet consists mainly of rice and vegetables. Sweet and Sour chicken recipes in Western countries are not exactly what you would find in China. Usually the Chinese use the sweet and sour flavor for fish recipes rather than for chicken. Also, the Chinese, unlike the Americans, do not drown their food in the sauce; rather they serve it on the side for dipping. The sweet and sour recipes for fish are associated with the region of Hunan in China. The recipes that we use in America do however combine the classical combination of the five flavors of: sweet, sour, salty, pungent and bitter. The Chinese do not use as much sweet as we do, and their recipes tend to be more on the bitter side; to create the sweet and sour flavor they mostly mix vinegar with sugar. It is believed that the authentic cuisine of China developed during the Manchus Dynasty of 1644-1911; they introduced a life of decadence and leisure, where food became an important feature in their three day long Imperial Banquets. For the Chinese, food is treated with utmost respect, and is associated with health, luck and prosperity.

There are several different variations of this dish but for the most part it was created to satisfy Western tastes but still keeping the tradition and flavor of China.