Posts tagged chinese food
Recipes to Try at Home: Cantonese Noodles
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Have you ever wanted to venture outside the typical meal? Do you want to impress someone with a new dish or just want to try to make one of your favorite dishes at home? Well, you’re in luck! Today I’m posting how to make one of our favorite dishes Cantonese Noodles!

The recipe comes from The Little Spice Jar website. Check it out below:

INGREDIENTS:

  • 12 ounces Hong Kong style egg noodles

  • 8 scallions

  • 2 teaspoons oyster sauce

  • ¼ cup low sodium soy sauce

  • 2 teaspoons sugar

  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic

  • ¼ – ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes

  • ½ teaspoon salt

  • 2 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil

  • 2 tablespoons high heat oil (such as canola, vegetable)

  • 1 ½ cups mixed veggies (such as coleslaw style cabbage, shredded carrots, and bean sprouts)

DIRECTIONS:

  1.  Bring a large stockpot of water to boil. While the water is boiling, separate the greens from the whites of the scallion. Cut into one-inch pieces then quarter the 1-inch piece vertically so you end up with thinly julienned scallions, set aside. In a bowl, combine the oyster sauce, soy sauce, sugar, minced garlic, red pepper flakes, salt, and 1 teaspoon of sesame oil, stir to combine, set aside.

  2. When the water comes to a boil, add the noodles and allow them to boil for 2-4 minutes (according to package directions). Drain and rinse under cold running water.

  3. Heat a large wok or a 16-18 inch skillet over high heat. Let the skillet heat for several minutes until it becomes SCREAMING HOT. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon of sesame oil and 1 tablespoon of canola oil. When the pan becomes very hot and the oil starts to shimmer, add the noodles in a thin even layer. Grab the handle and carefully swirl the pan so the oil evenly coats all the noodles. Allow the noodles to cook for 4-6 minute or until they become crispy.

  4. Flip the noodles over using a large spatula. Do this carefully, don’t worry if you cannot get all of them to turn at once. Do it in portions if necessary. Drizzle the remaining 1 tablespoon of sesame oil and 1 tablespoon of canola oil around the perimeters of the pan and again, lift the skillet with handle and swirl the pan to allow the oil to distribute. Let the noodles fry for an additional 3-5 minutes. Remove the noodles to a plate.

  5. Heat the remaining 1 teaspoon of sesame oil, along with the white part of the scallion and let sizzle for just 10 seconds. Add the shredded carrots if using, and let cook for an additional 10 seconds. Add the noodles back into the skillet and toss. Separate the noodles so there aren’t any large clumps. Toss in the shredded cabbage mix, if using and drizzle with the soy sauce mixture and toss continuously for 1-2 minutes or until the sauce distributes evenly over the noodles.

  6. Add the bean sprouts if using and the greens of scallions. Toss to combine and serve immediately.

NOTES:

  1. For vegetarians, you can swap the oyster sauce for dark soy sauce or an oyster flavored sauce (see ingredients some of them actually don’t contain oyster extract at all!)

  2. If you do not have a skillet/wok large enough to fit all the noodles, you can do this in 2 batches (use a ½ tablespoon of sesame oil and ½ tablespoon of canola oil per batch/per side.)

The prep and cook time all take about 15 mins totaling in half an hour. Now if that doesn’t sound easy and . like a complete meal I don’t know what does!

Try it out today and post your images to show how you did!

Monthly Horoscope: March Fire Rabbit
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The month of the Fire Rabbit of the Chinese calendar starts on March 7th and end on April 5th.

Though your luck for wealth is somewhat stable, the excessive waste in daily life will make you out of cash at the end of the month and ruin the investment opportunities. In workplace, you Rabbit people will be prone to misunderstanding and you should watch your tongue in communication with coworkers; some secrets and gossips you talked with them might be spread by someone. As for love relationship, you'd better say it directly and you will get an unexpected answer or surprise.

Your work will go well and you will be as busy as a bee for the project or business in your charge. The high-intensity state will improve your efficiency significantly and the work will go well with your efforts. The stressful work, however, will make you short-tempered and you should watch your attitude toward colleagues, or you will be envied and hated. Your income from work will be good but not for windfall, so stay away from gambling and consider about conservative investments or conventional savings.

Recipes to Try at Home: Spring Rolls
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SPRING ROLLS

  • Yield: 24 spring rolls

  • Prep Time: 10 minutes

  • Cook Time: 30 minutes

  • Total Time: 40 minutes

  • Course: Appetizer, dim sum

Spring Rolls are the vegetarian super light, crispy and tender vegetarian appetizer cousin of the traditional egg roll.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1/4 cup canola oil divided

  • 8 cups napa cabbage sliced thinly

  • 2 cloves garlic minced

  • 2 carrots sliced thinly

  • 8 ounces bamboo shoots sliced thinly

  • 2 tablespoons mirin

  • 1/4 cup low sodium soy sauce

  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil

  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch

  • 24 8" square spring roll wrappers

  • canola oil for frying

INSTRUCTIONS

Note: click on times in the instructions to start a kitchen timer while cooking.

  1. Add half the canola oil to a large heavy skillet on medium high heat and add in the napa cabbage cooking 8-10 minutes while stirring until almost all the liquid it releases has cooked off.

  2. Add in the garlic, carrots and bamboo shoots and cook for 1 minute while stirring before adding in the mirin, soy sauce and sesame oil and stirring again then let filling cool completely.

  3. Mix cornstarch with two tablespoons of water.

  4. Lay out the spring roll wrapper, brush cornstarch slurry around the edges to moisten and add about 2 tablespoons of filling in a long rectangle shape, folding in from the sides and rolling the wrappers closed tightly.

  5. Heat 3 inches of oil in a dutch oven to 325 degrees and fry the spring rolls until golden brown (about 2-3 minutes).

Celebrating Our Customers
Google Business  Image from one of our customers

Google Business Image from one of our customers

Windchimes has been so lucky to have such great customers through out the years. We are so happy that you enjoy our food and keep coming back for more!

We love to hear from you whether its through liking our Facebook posts or using our hashtag #WindchimesChinese food on any social media to connect all of us together.

One place that we’ve been seeing a lot of love is on Google Business. We get so many great reviews from you on our food and even get some great pictures too! We would love to celebrate how much you love us and will even feature your images on Facebook, Instagram, and Google Business. We love to see you get creative!

We love you and would love to show our appreciation! So, next time you’re in snap a picture and tag us #WindchimesChinese and find us on all the different types of social media!

 
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Happy Lunar New Year: The Celebration Begins
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Just because the new year has begun doesn't mean you're allowed to rest.

While most countries that observe Lunar New Year offer three to seven days of public holidays, celebrations don't end until the 15th day of the first lunar month, also known as the Lantern Festival. (Lunar New Year in 2019 lasts from February 5 to February 19.)

There is a list of superstitious dos and don'ts for the new year but the rule of thumb is to say a lot of "kung hei fat choy"or "gong xi fa cai," and avoid saying things that may sound like a less auspicious word.

During the festival, people will travel around to visit relatives, who will prepare snacks and fill up candy boxes for the visits -- except for the third day of the month.

It's believed that arguments are more likely to happen on that day -- February 9, this year -- called chi kou (or "red mouth"). Hence, most people will engage in other activities like visiting a temple. In Hong Kong, a major spring festival horse racing event takes place every year on the third day.

During the 15 days, married couples have to give out red packets filled with money to children (and unmarried adults) to wish them luck.

The seventh day is renri, or the people's birthday (February 11). when the Chinese mother goddess Nuwa is said to have created mankind.

The highlight comes on the last day, during the Lantern Festival (February 19).

Being the only day when young girls in ancient Chinese society could go out to admire lanterns and meet boys, it's also been dubbed Chinese Valentine's Day.

Nowadays, cities around the world still put on massive lantern displays and fairs on the 15th day of the festival.

Some create more sparks than others. Like Nuanquan, a small Chinese town that puts on a spectacular "firework" show by throwing molten metal against a cold stone city wall.

Kung hei fat choy!

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Pad Thai: Food History
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What is Pad Thai?

Pad thai is made with soaked dried rice noodles, which are stir-fried with eggs and chopped firm tofu, and is flavored with tamarind pulp, fish sauce, dried shrimp, garlic or shallots, red chili pepper and palm sugar and served with lime wedges and often chopped roasted peanuts. It may contain other vegetables like bean sprouts, garlic chives, pickled radishes or turnips, and raw banana flowers. It may also contain fresh shrimp, crab, squid, chicken or other animal products. Many of the ingredients are provided on the side as condiments such as the red chili pepper, lime wedges, roasted peanuts, bean sprouts and other miscellaneous fresh vegetables. Vegetarian versions may substitute soy sauce for the fish sauce and omit the shrimp.


Where did it come from?

A dish of stir-fried rice noodles is thought by some to have been introduced to Ayutthaya during the time of the Ayutthaya Kingdom by Chinese traders and subsequently altered to reflect Thai flavor profiles.

During World War II, Thailand suffered a rice shortage due to the war and floods. To reduce domestic rice consumption, the Thai government under Prime Minister Plaek Phibunsongkhram promoted eating noodles instead. His government promoted rice noodles and helped to establish the identity of Thailand. As a result, a new noodle called sen chan (named after Chanthaburi Province) was created. Pad thai has since become one of Thailand's national dishes. Today, some food vendors add pork or chicken (although the original recipe did not contain pork because of the government's perception that pork was a Chinese meat). Some food vendors still use the original recipe.

Come in to Windchimes today to try our version! You wont’ be disappointed!

Monthly Horoscope: December
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The Month of the Wood Rat of the Chinese calendar starts on December 7th, 2018 and ends on January 6th, 2019. On December 6th, the new moon announces the passage in the Chinese calendar from the Water Pig Month to the Month of the Wood Rat of the Year of the Earth Dog 2018.

It is a dynamic and warm cycle during which the family ties are consolidated, coupled with an increase in the desire for material possession.

According to the monthly Chinese horoscope of December 2018 and beginning of January 2019, the passage of the Rat (of the month) in the Dog (of the year) announces a period of positive actions supported by an inflexible will to face the difficulties with more ardor and insurance.

A Month of the Rat is an opportunity to explore, delve into and analyze problems in depth in order to find the most appropriate solution to the events that affect our daily lives.

On a social level, one's self-image can momentarily become more important than usual. Elegance and sobriety can take precedence over pageantry and exhibition in order to display an image of stability and anchorage. In addition, the desire to imagine, conceive and give life to new ideas, based on positive and simple values, is definitely relevant.

When starting a new project, the need for approval from one of one's peers isn't felt as much as a necessity. The Rat possesses in him secret and varied resources that allow many new initiatives to emerge from the 12 signs of Chinese astrology. In addition, we can expect help and moral support when our endeavor is implemented. It is even possible to return an unfavorable situation to one's advantage and extract an unsuspected personal profit, provided necessary insurance was in place to begin with.

The only negative point to note for this period concerns the character of the two Chinese zodiac signs whose energies dominate the calendar of the month. It should be known that the Dog (of the year) and the Rat (of the month) have anxious natures. Therefore, care should be taken not to be overcome by pessimism in the event of a delay in the progress of one's aspirations. While hopes are immediate, good things always take time to mature and bear fruit.


The Mystery of Kung Pao
Kung Pao Trio (includes beef, shrimp, and chicken)

Kung Pao Trio (includes beef, shrimp, and chicken)

Kung Pao chicken (Chinese: 宫保鸡丁), also transcribed as Gong Bao or Kung Po, is a spicy, stir-fried Chinese dish made with chicken, peanuts, vegetables, and chili peppers. The classic dish in Sichuan cuisine originated in the Sichuan Province of south-western China and includes Sichuan peppercorns. Although the dish is found throughout China, there are regional variations that are typically less spicy than the Sichuan serving. Kung Pao chicken is also a staple of westernized Chinese cuisine.

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The dish is believed to be named after Ding Baozhen (1820–1886), a late Qing Dynasty official and governor of Sichuan Province. His title was Gongbao (Chinese: 宫保; pinyin: Gōngbǎo; Wade–Giles: Kung1-pao3; literally: "Palace Guardian"). The name Kung Pao chicken is derived from this title.

There are a few different versions of the dish from the original Sichuan version that has diced chicken is typically mixed with a prepared marinade. In Sichuan, or when preparing Sichuan-style Kung Pao chicken, only Sichuan-style chili peppers such as facing heaven pepper or seven stars pepper are used. It is these peppercorns that give authentic Kung Pao chicken its distinctive numbing flavor. Kung Pao chicken starts off with fresh, moist, unroasted peanuts or cashew nuts. These are often used instead of their pre-roasted versions. The peanuts or cashew nuts are dropped into the hot oil at the bottom of the wok, then deep-fried until golden brown before the other ingredients are added.

Versions commonly found in the west, called Kung Pao chickenKung Po, or just chicken chili and garlic, consist of diced, marinated chicken, stir-fried with orange or orange juice, ginger, garlic, chicken broth, sugar, cooking oil, corn starch, and salt and pepper to taste. The dish often includes or is garnished with whole roasted peanuts. Instead of chicken, western variations sometimes substitute other meat such as pork, duck, fish, or tofu.

Come try our version today!


What are Singapore Noodles?
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Singapore Noodles is a dish of stir-fried rice vermicelli seasoned with curry powder, vegetables, scrambled eggs and meat, most commonly chicken, beef, char siu pork, or prawns.Even though you would think it would a be a dish created in the town in which is named after it actually was Chinese-American creation.

This dish looks more complicated than it is. It consist of Rice vermicellia dried noodles, egg, meat and a handful of different types of vegetables. All of this can be personalized for you taste and YES, you can even make this at home!

Don’t believe me? Check out this simple recipe:

One of the most popular stir fried noodles, made at home! Made with Chinese BBQ Pork (Char Siu), prawns/shrimp, egg and vegetables with a signature curry seasoning. See notes for a quick Char Siu and subs. This recipe makes 2 generous servings. Recipe video below.

Course: Noodles, Stir Fry, Street Food

Cuisine: Asian, Chinese, Hong Kong, Singapore

Servings: 2

Calories: 555 kcal

Author: Nagi | RecipeTin Eats

Ingredients

Sauce

  • 2 tbsp soy sauce (Note 1)

  • 2 tbsp Chinese cooking wine (Note 2)

  • 2 1/2 tsp curry powder (hot or ordinary, Note 3)

  • 1/2 tsp sugar

  • 1/2 tsp white pepper (black also ok)

Stir Fry

  • 100g / 3 oz dried rice vermicelli noodles (Note 4)

  • 2 tbsp peanut oil , separated

  • 8-10 medium raw shrimp / prawns , shelled and deveined

  • 2 eggs , beaten

  • 1/2 medium onion , thinly sliced (yellow, brown or white)

  • 4 garlic cloves , minced

  • 1 tsp ginger , freshly grated

  • 1/2 lb / 250g Chinese barbecue pork (Char Siu), thinly sliced (Note 5)

  • 1 cup red capsicum / bell pepper

  • 2 tsp thinly sliced hot green pepper (adjust to taste, optional)

Instructions

  1. Combine the Sauce ingredients in a small bowl and mix.

  2. Place rice vermicelli noodles in a large bowl filled with boiled water and soak as per packet instructions. Drain and set aside.

  3. Heat 1 tbsp of oil in a wok or heavy based fry pan over medium heat. Add the shrimp/prawns, cook until just cooked - about 2 1/2 to 3 minutes. Remove and set aside.

  4. Add the egg and spread it out to make a thin omelette. Once set, use a spatula to roll it up, remove from the wok and slice (while still rolled up).

  5. Return the wok to medium heat and add the remaining 1 tbsp of oil. Add the garlic, ginger and onion, cook for 2 minutes until onion is slightly softened.

  6. Add capsicum and cook for 1 minute.

  7. Add noodles and Sauce, give it a few tosses. Then add the egg, pork,  shrimp/prawns, chillies (if using). Toss until the sauce coats all the noodles and everything is heated through - about 1 to 2 minutes.

  8. Serve immediately.

Notes

1. I use all purpose soy sauce (Kikkoman) or light soy sauce. I don't recommend dark soy sauce, the flavour is too intense.

2. Also known as Shaoxing wine. Substitute with dry sherry, cooking sake or Mirin. If you can't consume alcohol, use chicken broth.

3. Any generic curry powder is fine here. I use Keens or Clives of India, both general curry powders sold at supermarkets. I use hot because I like the spice!

4. Wai Wai is the brand I recommend if you can get it, for both texture and also it holds up well to lots of tossing action. Rice vermicelli is very cheap - usually $2 for quite a large bag - and nowadays you'll find it at everyday supermarkets.

I know it doesn't sound like much noodles but it expands, almost doubles in weight.

5. If you don't have store bought or homemade Char Siu  substitute with diced chicken, bacon, ham or pork, leave it out and/or add more vegetables. For a quick Char Siu, make a small quantity of the Char Siu marinade, marinade pork chops for 20 minutes then pan fry on medium until caramelised, or bake at 180C/350F for around 20 minutes. Then use per recipe.

6. How to tell shrimp/prawns are perfectly cooked: raw prawns hang straight, perfectly cooked prawns form a "C" shape and overcooked prawns are tightly curled into an "O" shape.

7. Adapted from Singapore-Style Rice Vermicelli by Saucy Spatula

8. Nutrition per serving.

But if you don’t like to cook just come into Windchimes and order it!

What is Lo Mein?
 
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There are so many different types of Chinese food that have spread through out American culture thanks to several of Chinese food restaurants all over the continent. Dishes like General Tso's and the basic Stir Fry has become an common food in our diets and even have become hybrid in other everyday food. One of the most common dishes is Lo Mein. But what is Lo Mein and how did it become the famous dish it is? 

 Lo Mein in so many places, it actually originated in China, as a wheat flour noodle dish. It is unclear exactly who invented the process of mixing water and flour to make noodles, but the Chinese have been eating them for over 2,000 years! This takes us back to the Han Dynasty (206 B.C. – 220 A.D.). Noodles have become a large part of Chinese culture. They are almost always served long and uncut because they symbolize a long and prosperous life. They are even part of big celebrations like birthdays and sometimes placed on grave sites for good luck.

The word itself comes from the Cantonese “lōu mihn” meaning “stirred noodles” and is actually traditionally made from elastic thin flour or egg noodles. Many people intertwine Chow Mein and Lo Mein, but they are two different dishes. Chow Mein is made from the same noodles as Lo Mein, but instead of keeping the noodles soft, Chow Mein contains fried noodles, which may sometimes be very crispy.

The two types of noodles you most commonly see are wheat noodles and rice noodles. Now, wheat noodles can be found all over China, but they originated in the Northern parts of China where wheat was a staple crop. Making these noodles is considered an art and you can sometimes see street noodle vendors “pulling” the dough to make the noodles.

 
 

Lo Mein has a history and has even become so popular that there are several ways you can now make it. There are even recipes online. Try to make Lo Mein for yourself but if you want to avoid the hassle just come in and get some from us!