Posts tagged columbus chinese food
The Beauty of Take-Out
 
Sweet_Sour-Boxes-Large.jpg
 

Take out is one of the greatest inventions in the food industry and has brought so many fun flavors to so many people but where did it begin?

This concept of "take out" prepared meals can date back to antiquity times. It was very common in Ancient Greece and Rome for roadside stalls to sell food to passengers walking by. This can be seen in the ruins of Pompeii where archaeologists found a number of service like counters open toward the street to provide food to be taken away. They also saw that there was a lack of a kitchen like area in the homes of people who lived in Pompeii which could lead to believe that getting meals to take home was more common than not. This wasn't the only evidence. Places like Europe still to this day have several foods ranging from meat pies to tarts that can be purchased to go and enjoyed elsewhere. 

 
GT_Foot_blanket_3.jpg
 

Even with the popularity of other places and their take out/carry out foods nothing can compare to take out Chinese food.  I don't know if it's the dishes that seems so elaborate andd delicious or that it's just something that I don't regularly make but being able to purchase this food and bring it home to my house makes it not only special but also as a staple in our daily lives. It's something that has become a comfort to me. And don't get me wrong I love going out to eat as much as the next person but who doesn't love being able to bring some tasty food home and eat it on the couch while watching Netflix shows in the pjs with only their cats to judge them. 

Thank you take out gods by allowing us to enjoy a variety of foods that we couldn't even dare to dream could exist! I can't wait to order some Windchimes now and sit on my porch as I watch the sun go down. 

How do you like to enjoy your take out food? Also feel free to take pictures of where you enjoy your Windchimes meal and post them to our Facebook page! 

Fried Rice: Why It's So Good?!
 
fried_rice.jpg
 

What makes fried rice so good? I was floored the other day when I finally tried Windchimes' fried rice. It had a flavor that I had never tasted before and couldn't stop eating it. I couldn't stop thinking about it and had to go back to get it again. It was almost too good for words! Though, it got me thinking what exactly was fried rice and what is the history behind it.

The basics is fried rice is typically pre cooked rice that has been stir-fried in a wok or frying pan and is usually mixed with other ingredients such as eggs, vegetables, seafood, or meat. Most of the time it's made from left overs from other dishes and can be eaten on it's own or as a pair to another fish. 

While the exact origins of fried rice are lost to history, it’s believed that it was invented sometime during the Sui dynasty (A.D. 589–618), in the city of Yangzhou in eastern Jiangsu province. Yangchow (Yangzhou) fried rice is still the standard by which all other Chinese fried rice dishes are judged: morsels of fluffy rice tossed with roast pork, prawns, scallions, and peas. In American-Chinese restaurants, you’ll sometimes find it called "special fried rice." Today, fried rice dishes are found throughout China, particularly in the south, where rice is the staple grain.

But why is it so good? I think one factor that comes from it being so good is the nostalgic aspect of it.  For me fried rice was an easy dish I could make easily enough for myself when I first lived on my own. Something so easy as taking leftover Chinese food and throwing it into a pan and adding an egg to it (for protein!) and some veggies to make it a balanced meal. It was quick and good. I still think of those simpler times and every time I have fried rice I'm taken back to that place.

 
Cuban Fried Rice

Cuban Fried Rice

 

Fried rice has also spread to other countries putting their own spin on the popular dish. From Thailand to Cuba and Portugal to Japan. All these places have their own versions that have some basis of the original dish but making it their own and I can't wait to try them all!

Who is General Tso?
 
General_TSO_Grass.jpg
 

General Tso is one of the most popular dishes at Windchimes. This sweet yet spicy, deep-fried chicken treat brings customers in but leaves them with the popular question of "who is General Tso?"

This dish is said to be named after Zuo Zongtang, a Qing dynasty statesman and military leader. There is no real connection to him or the dish from the Hunan Province and even his descendants, when interviewed, had never heard of the dish. There is also claim that a Taiwan-based Hunan chef named Peng Chang-kuei invented the popular dish. Peng started inventing new dishes and modifying traditional ones during the early 20th century when he moved to New York to open up a restaurant. He was not the only to lay claim to the dish. Shun Lee Palaces in New York City clamed to be the first restaurant to serve General Tso's chicken and states it was invented by a Chinese immigrant chef named T.T. Wang in 1972. 

"We opened the first Hunanese restaurant in the whole country, and the four dishes we offered you will see on the menu of practically every Hunanese restaurant in America today. They all copied from us."[2]

Even though there are several claims to the General Tso's history it can be reconciled that the current General Tso's chicken recipe was introduced by Chef Wang but as "General Ching's" a name which still has trace appearances on menus on the Internet (the identity of its namesake "General Ching" is, however, unclear); whereas the name "General Tso's chicken" traces to Chef Peng, who cooked it in a different way.

Screen_Shot_2015-02-07_at_8.55.08_.2e16d0ba.fill-735x490.png

He may not be an actual person but General Tso sure does leave customers at several Chinese restaurants very, very pleased! Thank you!

 

Daily Horoscope: June 13th, 2018
 
raf,750x1000,075,t,dd2121_8219e99865.u5.jpg

 

Chinese calendar:
Day of the Fire Rat
Month of the Fire Snake
Year of the Earth Dog 2018

Polarity of the Day: Yang
Polarity of the Month: Yin
Polarity of the Year: Yang
Lucky directions: North
Lucky colors: Green
 

erat48.jpg

THE FIRE RAT IS ENDOWED WITH AN AMAZINGLY PASSIONATE NATURE, WHICH HE WILLINGLY SHARES WITH THE PEOPLE HE LOVES.

Intelligent and lively, he succeeds in expressing his creativity in group activities to the best of his ability: he is more willing to be a director or an actor than a painter or writer.

On a day of the Fire Rat, work meetings, so often boring and unnecessary, bear unexpected fruits. Dialogue and interaction between usually lonely personalities make it possible to clear unexplored territories for the greater benefit of the community.

Young lovers take advantage of the evening to declare their flame for the first time. If a few springs have already passed since your first kiss, offer your partner flowers and an impromptu getaway, whose simplicity and freshness will only revive the memories of your never forgotten first moments together.

Daily Energetic chart: Lack of Wood element
Birth's character and destiny (BaGua): The Inner Truth

Solar calendar: Gemini

 
Wasabi: The Spice of Life
WASABI.jpg

Ever wonder where wasabi comes from? It seems like the bright green blob squeezed out of a tube was just always like that, a course paste. But was it? And where does it actually come from?

Wasabi is a plant of the  Brassicaceae family, which also includes horseradish and mustard. This makes sense because it has that very intense, up front flavor right as it enters your mouth. The plant that is comes from looks very odd. It has leaves and a very large looking root. But that root is actually the stem to the leaves of the plant and where the wasabi comes from. Yeah, I know that it doesn’t seem like that large, coarse root could contain a bright green paste but it does you just have to know how to get it. When making wasabi you have to use a special metal grater called a oroshigane. This grinds the stem very finely creating the course, green paste that you know as wasabi.

 
WASABI_SHRIMP_NOTEXT.jpg
 

Traditionally it comes from Japan and is known for being used alongside sushi, though there are other ways to use it. At Windchimes our chief has used this spicy paste to kick up the flavors of some food such as tuna and shrimp. The Wasabi Shrimp dish starts off very flavorful and you don’t taste the wasabi right away. Then like a cat stalking a mouse it slowly creeps up on and then pounces on your taste buds. Wasabi provides a fun food experience giving your mouth a different sensation of flavors and spice. Who knew that this stem could pack such a punch and give our food a flavor we didn’t know we needed.

The Beauty of Ugly Delicious

Chinese Food is one of the most popular foods in America. Think about all the Chinese Food places you see around town, small and large. Just think about the iconic image of Apple Pie being “American”. When is the last time you’ve even had Apple Pie? Now think about the last time you’ve had Chinese food. I bet you’ve had Chinese Food way more than Apple Pie. So, does that make it more American?  

Recently I’ve been binging the Netflix show Ugly Delicious where star chef David Chang leads friends around the world discovering iconic twists on traditions and surprising links between cultures.

 
 

The episode that really caught my attention was the episode called Fried Rice. It was talking about the population of Chinese food in America and how it began and the cultural baggage that went with it. Most Chinese people immigrated to the United States during the 19th century working as laborers, particularly on the railways.  During that time there were a lot of angry Americans (go figure) who didn’t want these immigrants taking their jobs, which lead to violence and terrible laws like the Chinese Exclusion Act which prohibited the immigrated from China for the next 10 years of that date. With this act lead a lot of Chinese people who were already in the States needing to find other means of work so they began opening up laundry services and restaurants. This lead to the spread and population of Chinese Food. 

Chinese Food is an American staple. It’s something that we’ve all experienced and taken comfort in. I know for me Sweet & Sour Chicken makes me think of going out to dinner on Friday nights with my parents and grandparents and how it was something special. I know it’s not authentic Chinese but it’s something that makes me all warm and fuzzy inside. I’m sure other  people have their nostalgic Chinese food too but watching this show made me want to venture out beyond my usual too. I feel that Windchimes restaurant is like that. They have all the comforts there but also other more authentic Chinese Food too. After watching this show really wanted me to boarded my horizons to trying new Chinese food and I think this is the perfect place to start. Who’s with me?

 
Also who says it can't be pretty?

Also who says it can't be pretty?