Posts tagged shareable
Celebrating Our Customers
Google Business  Image from one of our customers

Google Business Image from one of our customers

Windchimes has been so lucky to have such great customers through out the years. We are so happy that you enjoy our food and keep coming back for more!

We love to hear from you whether its through liking our Facebook posts or using our hashtag #WindchimesChinese food on any social media to connect all of us together.

One place that we’ve been seeing a lot of love is on Google Business. We get so many great reviews from you on our food and even get some great pictures too! We would love to celebrate how much you love us and will even feature your images on Facebook, Instagram, and Google Business. We love to see you get creative!

We love you and would love to show our appreciation! So, next time you’re in snap a picture and tag us #WindchimesChinese and find us on all the different types of social media!

 
Screen Shot 2019-02-20 at 10.27.47 AM.png
 


What is Egg Foo Yung?
CU_egg.jpg

Egg foo young is an omelette dish found in Chinese, Indonesian, British, and Chinese American cuisine.

Literally meaning "Hibiscus egg", this dish is prepared with beaten eggs and most often minced ham. It may be made with various vegetables such as bean sprouts, bamboo shoots, sliced cabbage, spring onions, mushrooms, and water chestnuts. When meat is used as an ingredient, a choice of roast pork, shrimp, chicken, beef, or lobster may be offered.

In Chinese Indonesian cuisine, it is known as fu yung hai, sometimes spelled as pu yung hai. The omelette is usually made from the mixture of vegetables such as carrots, bean sprouts, and cabbages, mixed with meats such as crab meat, shrimp, or minced chicken. The dish is served in sweet and sour sauce with peas.

In Western countries, the dish usually appears as a well-folded omelette with the non-egg ingredients embedded in the egg mixture, covered in or served with sauce or gravy. Chinese chefs in the United States, at least as early as the 1930s, created a pancake filled with eggs, vegetables, and meat or seafood. In a U.S. regional variation, many American-Chinese restaurants in St. Louis, Missouri, serve what is called a St. Paul sandwich, which is an egg foo young patty served with mayonnaise, dill pickle, and sometimes lettuce and tomato between two slices of white bread.

In the Netherlands, which has a local variation on the Chinese Indonesian cuisine, it is known as Foe yong hai, and is usually served with a sweet tomato sauce. Strictly, according to hai in the name, it should contain crab, but it is often served without this ingredient.

There are several other variations in different countries of this dish but all have the simple start of an omelette. You should come in and try ours and see what you think!

Mid-Autumn Festival
2880px-Mid-Autumn_Festival-beijing.jpg

Monday was the Mid-Autumn Festival celebrated notably by the Chinese and Vietnamese people.

The Chinese have celebrated the harvest during the autumn full moon since the Shang dynasty (c. 1600–1046 BCE). Morris Berkowitz, who studied the Hakka people during the 1960s, theorizes that the harvest celebration originally began with worshiping mountain deities after the harvest was completed. For the Baiyue peoples, the harvest time commemorated the dragon who brought rain for the crops. The celebration as a festival only started to gain popularity during the early Tang dynasty (618–907 CE).One legend explains that Emperor Xuanzong of Tang started to hold formal celebrations in his palace after having explored the Moon-Palace. The term mid-autumn (中秋) first appeared in Rites of Zhou, a written collection of rituals of the Western Zhou dynasty (1046–771 BCE).

Of course there are certain types of food involved.

mooncake-festival-2015.jpg
 

Mooncakes: Making and sharing mooncakes is one of the hallmark traditions of this festival. In Chinese culture, a round shape symbolizes completeness and reunion. Thus, the sharing and eating of round mooncakes among family members during the week of the festival signifies the completeness and unity of families.

Imperial dishes: served on this occasion included nine-jointed lotus roots which symbolize peace, and watermelons cut in the shape of lotus petals which symbolize reunion.

Teacups & Wine: Teacups were placed on stone tables in the garden, where the family would pour tea and chat, waiting for the moment when the full moon's reflection appeared in the center of their cups.Owing to the timing of the plant's blossoms, cassia wine is the traditional choice for the "reunion wine" drunk on the occasion. Also, people will celebrate by eating cassia cakes and candy.

Food offerings: made to deities are placed on an altar set up in the courtyard, including apples, pears, peaches, grapes, pomegranates, melons, oranges, and pomelos.[25]One of the first decorations purchased for the celebration table is a clay statue of the Jade Rabbit.

western_lake_mooncakes.jpg

Nowadays, in southern China, people will also eat some seasonal fruit that may differ in different district but carrying the same meaning of blessing.

The festival celebrates three fundamental concepts that are closely connected:

  • Gathering, such as family and friends coming together, or harvesting crops for the festival. It's said the moon is the brightest and roundest on this day which means family reunion. And this is the main reason why people think mid-autumn is important.

  • Thanksgiving, to give thanks for the harvest, or for harmonious unions

  • Praying (asking for conceptual or material satisfaction), such as for babies, a spouse, beauty, longevity, or for a good future

Traditions and myths surrounding the festival are formed around these concepts, although traditions have changed over time due to changes in technology, science, economy, culture, and religion. 

My First Chinese Restaurant Experience
asian-china-antique-buildings-circular-door-beijing-grand-view-garden-simple-elegant-46760669.jpg

I remember my first Chinese Restaurant experience fondly. There was something special about it that has left an impression on me and my memory. When I think about it I've been to so many different restaurants in my 32 years of life and most of them I don't remember but New Peking Chinese Restaurant will always have a special place in my heart. 

Honestly, I don't really know if this was the first time I had actually had Chinese food or not but this place I remember going to as a family. We would go with my mom ,sister, Grandpa and Japanese Grandma to this spot off of North Dixie in a semi tiny strip mall (where all the good food is in the midwest). I just remember it having a big red door that transported you into a different world of smells and visual memories. We would always go on a Wednesday when my dad would be out golfing with his friends and we got to treat ourselves to some dinner out. I remember the menu having so much food that ranged not only from Chinese food but also Korean. This was the first time I had ever seen Bipmpop and it was impressive! 

91b93b78-f203-4d4a-a943-2f7e27c0ccac.png

Since I was a pretty picker eater those days so I was scared of half of the menu because I didn't know what to expect. I had always liked chicken and thought that you couldn't really go wrong with something that could be both sweet and sour and ordered that dish in hopes that it would be ok. And boy was it! The taste was so new and interesting and left my taste buds confused and excited made me really interested in the wold of Chinese food and what it all had to offer. In a way I couldn't believe that there was this food out there and so many varieties of it. Even though New Peking is no longer around I will always remember that red door and how it opened my taste buds to new experiences and every time I taste sweet and sour chicken I think not only of that but also the wonderful times I had there with family and how Chinese food can bring people together.

Inspiring Foods: The History of Moo Shu
 
IMG_8853.JPG
 

Last week I decided to be adventurous and try a new dish at Windchimes. I searched through the menu as my mouth watered at all the delicious sounding food when I finally found what i wanted. I wanted the Moo Shu Chicken.

This stir fried dish served with your choice of meat with cabbage, bamboo shoots, carrots and egg in a plum sauce sounded really good. Though there was an interesting element that caught my attention and was the reason i wanted to try this dish out. It came with a pancake?! What did that mean? I had to try it and I was not disappointed.

Afterward I was curious about how this dish was created since a lot of the Chinese food comes from different regions that specialize in their own flavors or types of food. This dish comes from the northern Chinese origin originating from Shandong, a coastal province and appearing in the United States in the late 1960s. Typically the Moo Shu dish is created with pork tenderloin, cucumber, and scrambled eggs, stir fried in sesame or peanut oil together with mushrooms and minced ginger and garlic. As this dish grew popularity in the United States the chefs had to start to modify the recipe to use ingredients that are easier and more available in the states. This is why they started to use green cabbage, carrots, scallions and bean sprouts a lot more in the dish. Like most dishes that are popular there are a lot of different variations of them from restaurant to restaurant adding their own flavor and twist on it.

 
IMG_8863.JPG
 

My favorite adaptation in the pancake that is served with the dish. The pancake is a white tortilla-like wrapper made of flour and is used to hold all of the contents of the dish. It's basically eaten like a taco and there are even some Chinese restaurants that began serving Mexican style flour tortillas with the dish. I love the way that food has come to grow and adapt to their surroundings and the culture around them that is different then their own. It really illustrates the beauty of America and how we are a melting pot of so many different cultures. 

 

Lets Eat!: Shareable Foods
 
Chicken Lettuce Wraps meant to be shared!

Chicken Lettuce Wraps meant to be shared!

 

Food is an important part of Chinese people's lives. Food is not only seen as enjoyment but also a way to bring others together such as family and friends. 

There are several dishes on the Windchimes menu's that "shareable". Such as the Shrimp Toast, Chicken Lettuce wraps, or the Mango Shrimp. Just look at the portion of food that is presented when it comes hotly out of the kitchen. It's HUGE! It' also, usually, plated in a way that makes it easy to share and allows everyone to enjoy in the deliciousness of the food!

Sharing isn't just a nice act to do when enjoying a meal, it's also good manners in Chinese culture. Food is very important and has a deep rooted history of not only flavors but also courtesy. There is a lot of respect that goes into dining like presenting the best food to senior members of the family first to honor them. Also celebrating special moments in ones life like a birthday (or maybe Mother's Day) at a Chinese Restaurant to eat noodles not only shows respect for tradition but also is a great way to enjoy a meal with the important people in your life.

Sharing with family

Sharing with family

Being able to share food is also a way to be more adventurous and try a few different flavors. Why not try Hunan Pork or the Sizzling House Noodles. Take your taste buds on an adventure and why not bring a friend along for the ride.