Posts tagged windchimes Dublin
Recipes to Try at Home: Kung Pao Chicken
#WindchimesChinese #WindchimeColumbus #KungPaoChicken

#WindchimesChinese #WindchimeColumbus #KungPaoChicken

Ingredients

1 h 30 m4 servings437 cals

  • 1 pound skinless, boneless chicken breast halves - cut into chunks

  • 2 tablespoons white wine

    Chateau Ste. Michelle Chardonnay

    Smooth with bright apple and citrus notes

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  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce

  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil, divided

  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch, dissolved in 2 tablespoons water

  • 1 ounce hot chile paste

  • 1 teaspoon distilled white vinegar

  • 2 teaspoons brown sugar

  • 4 green onions, chopped

  • 1 tablespoon chopped garlic

  • 1 (8 ounce) can water chestnuts

  • 4 ounces chopped peanuts

    Planters Lightly Salted Dry Roasted Peanuts 16 Oz

    $3.00 for 1 item - expires in 2 weeks

  • Add all ingredients to list

Directions

Prep 30 m

Cook 30 m

Ready In 1 h 30 m

  1. To Make Marinade: Combine 1 tablespoon wine, 1 tablespoon soy sauce, 1 tablespoon oil and 1 tablespoon cornstarch/water mixture and mix together. Place chicken pieces in a glass dish or bowl and add marinade. Toss to coat. Cover dish and place in refrigerator for about 30 minutes.

  2. To Make Sauce: In a small bowl combine 1 tablespoon wine, 1 tablespoon soy sauce, 1 tablespoon oil, 1 tablespoon cornstarch/water mixture, chili paste, vinegar and sugar. Mix together and add green onion, garlic, water chestnuts and peanuts. In a medium skillet, heat sauce slowly until aromatic.

  3. Meanwhile, remove chicken from marinade and saute in a large skillet until meat is white and juices run clear. When sauce is aromatic, add sauteed chicken to it and let simmer together until sauce thickens.

Monthly Horoscope: May Earth Snake
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The zodiacal sign this month is the Earth Snake. In order to cross this monthly period as peacefully as possible it’s stated that the signs of Rat, Rabbit, and Rooster to align more with the qualities of the governing sign of the year, the Pig concentrating most of their leisure activity relating at home. It’s stated that you should be nice during this month especially the signs of Tiger, Dog, and Horse. Regarding the Goat, Dragon, and Monkey strongly recommends to nurture any concrete action and follow your dreams. The Ox will avoid falling into pessimism, trying to maintain a dynamic and logical spirit by organizing of their life to be as serene as possible.

Here’s the breakdown for each sign:

Rat - is better to postpone an important trip to later. If you can not do otherwise, plan all your upstream expenses to avoid being surprised by an unexpected cash outflow. Do not let invading friends distract you from your priorities. Give priority to quality over quantity. Take care of yourself. This is not the time to lose strength.

Ox - Things seem to be stabilizing little by little. An unexpected income is possible. Be careful what you say under stress. Some in your entourage will not hesitate to distort your comments. Be clear and determined in your affective and sentimental relationships. Stay dynamic.

Tiger - the period looks favorable for an organized withdrawal. Sometimes it’s better to let things come to you. Leave nothing to chance and be very square in the classification and maintenance of your important documents. Look after your emotional relationships. Time and time, you will come our victorious.

Rabbit - this is a serene month for you, during which things improve, even if the pace of this evolution is not fast enough in your eyes. In reality, the time is favorable for the consolidation of your projects. Life smiles at you and even hobbies become possible. However, in the perspective of the better harvest, it’s better to continue patiently. Get rid of all the objects around your house and work that no longer have any functional or decorative virtue.

Dragon - some interesting trips are to be expected in the second half of the month of the snake. If despite this, you feel that things are starting to stagnate again at work, it’s because you may have chosen the wrong person with whom you are currently negotiating. Do not neglect your family or close friends. Without even knowing it or wanting to admit it, you need beneficial energies.

Snake - you are enjoying a little moment of break at the start of this exhausting Chinese year, during which the events finally take pleasant turn. You feel more seasoned and in better shape. In addition, you know perfectly well you control the situation, while it is not necessarily the case of the person by your side. Avoid being too proud. Strive to be kinder in stressful situations. you could gain lasting alliances.

Horse - The events keep the same dynamics as the previous month. But this time finally take the time to solve a problem that has been around for some time. You have the strength to overcome obstacles. Do not refuse the help you are being offered without taking the time to think about it first. No imprudence during night outings. Stay calm if you are provoked, it may be time to go home.

Goat - It’s a great month ahead for you. A boost of fate can occur and fortune can smile your way. Unexpected recognition, sentimental encounters, and popularity may occur during this month. Just avoid being too stressed or greedy. Just show that you are ready to face your destiny. On the other hand stick to your promises and avoid ruminating in public.

Monkey - if you have a Snake in your family or close friends it’s time to visit him or her. During new encounters or at your work, do not say anything that could hurt you. During this month show your diplomacy skills that will condition the coming months. In this case you have an unfailing support of your co-workers and trust future for fortune will not forsaken you.

Rooster - manage to preserve the harmony within your home because you know how to question yourself. The situation is stable which allows you to foresee the interesting opportunities on the horizon. It may be best to postpone an acquisition project to take more time to understand your commitments. Beware of the jealousy of others in case of material or amorous success. Do not be too forceful because it can be annoying.

Dog - it’s favorable this month in material acquisitions. Listen to advice you are given before any transactions. You will succeed in gaining the admiration of people who matter to you. Optimize your work time to be more profitable and do not be too impatient. You are appreciated for your loyalty. Things are improving, especially on the financial side.

Pig - even if you have recovered, keep you energy for useful things. If your prospects are good financially, still avoid the temptation of any spending frenzy. Do not be impatient when negotiating new trade agreements. Take the time to study all the possibilities of what is being offered to you. Take a break in the countryside if you feel like you’re becoming unable to control your impulses. Keep hardheaded whatever happens.

Fruit in Chinese Food
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As I slowly eat my way through the Windchimes Menu I realized that there were a lot of dishes that included an ingredient that typically isn’t part of a main dish: Fruit. I was curious why this was such a staple in Chinese food ranging from Orange, Mango, to even Pineapple. I dug around to see why this was an important ingredient to some of my favorite dishes and here’s what I found:

One way chefs create new dishes is to make use of fruits in season. Doing so produces dishes with new color, texture, and flavor. When fruits are not in season they need not despair, but use them dehydrated. They can and do use fruits such as raisons, dried apricots, sugared preserved fruits such as jams, and even canned and frozen fruits.

In southern cooking, such as that around Guangzhou, chefs make use of local fresh fruits frequently using peaches, lychees and longans. Perhaps because of influences from neighboring south sea islands, they also find and use pineapples, bananas, coconuts, and rambutans. In the mid-Yangtze valley in and around Shanghai, Hwaiyang and Yangzhou, chefs use fresh apples, dates, and pears and their preserved relatives. In the north, around Beijing and Shandung, apples, apricots, pears, persimmons, and dates are popular fresh and dried. And in the west, chefs from the Hunan and Sichuan provinces add fruits to their spicy dishes including oranges, longans, and lychees to satisfy their yen for sweet in their dishes. Occasionally sweet dishes without spiciness are even used departing from the routine flavorings in this region.

Since Chinese do not make clear demarcations between medicinal herbs and fruits or vegetables, in their cooking they also use herbs such as dried san tza which are crab apples or go ji better known as Lyceum Chinese. Both of these herb-fruits have a slight sweet and an acidic taste; people like them because they are good for you and highly nutritious.

So, next time you are in check out some of the dishes that include fruit and think about how great it is to be able to have this dish all year round!

Food for Thought: Chinese and Japanese Cuisine
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Here’s a great expert from an article about Chinese and Japanese food culture in the United States:

Chinese food has been part of American food culture for as long as most of us can remember, thanks to the pioneering emigrants who opened early Chinese restaurants. The chop suey and chow mein our grandparents associated with Chinese food, however, were created to please the American customer. Real Chinese food ranges from the elegant simplicity of Cantonese cuisine to the fiery flavors of Sichuan fare, and there are no canned sprouts involved. The tofu of China is of the very firm, porous style, sturdy enough to stir-fry. Fermented black beans, which are actually black soy beans, supply a wonderfully funky flavor that goes well with a little sesame oil and chile. Toasted sesame  and hot sesame oils are both meant to be used as flavoring agents, not cooking oils. Seafood and vegetable dishes are often flavored with a drizzle of nutty sesame oil to give them a meaty quality, so try doing the same with your own seafood and vegetable creations. Sesame paste is used in sauces and dressings, and when I can't find the Chinese variety (made from toasted sesame seeds), I substitute tahini (made from untoasted sesame seeds), to make Chinese style noodle sauces and dressings. Try stirring some with soy sauce, sugar and vinegar and drizzling over salad or a stir fry just before serving. Dried vegetables, like dried mushrooms or cabbage, are important flavors in the Chinese kitchen, and I use dried mushrooms to add heartiness to vegetable stocks and stir fries.

Japanese food has become synonymous with sushi and tempura, but those popular dishes are just the beginning. Slow simmered stews, grilled skewers of meats and vegetables, savory pancakes and endless noodles are just a few more. The Japanese gave us silken style tofu, the slippery soft kind that is usually floated in the miso soup I love. Miso is just one of the many fermented and pickled foods developed centuries ago as a way to preserve food that endures today and enhances the flavor of so many Japanese dishes. Tamari, shoyu, rice wine and rice vinegar are other fermented, deep aged flavors. Use tamari and shoyu for salt in darker colored dishes, and substitute rice vinegar—with its wonderful tang—for white or red vinegar in dressings.  Most of us might never have tried seaweed if not for sushi or miso soup, but sea vegetables are a way of life in Japan. I like to crumble nori over salads, add soaked arame to soups, or add a piece of kombu to simmering beans, which is said to make them more digestible, and certainly adds minerals.

Both China and Japan are known for their use of very fresh ingredients, whether it's dispatching freshly caught fish right into the pan, or frequent shopping trips to pick up the freshest produce. As a chef and eater, I appreciate this practice, as well as their convention of stretching a small piece of meat by stir-frying it with lots of vegetables and accompanying it with rice and noodles for a satisfying and filling meal.